WISHART, George

BY LE GASCON?

I.G. de rebus auspiciis serenissimi, & potentissimi Caroli gratia magnæ Britanniæ, &c. sub imperio illustrissimi Iacobi Montisrosarum marchionis…: Supremi Scotiæ gubernatoris anno 1644, & duobus sequentibus præclarè gestis, commentarius.

Paris, ex Typographia Ioannis Bessin, propè Collegium Remense. 1648.

£4,250

8vo. pp. (xxiv), 563 (i). Large paper, Roman letter, some Italic. Woodcut and typographical headpieces, small woodcut initials, printed label, ‘6506’ from the sale of Bolongaro-Crevenna at head of front pastedown, bookplate of Robert Maxtone Graham below. Light age yellowing, the very rare marginal spot. A fine, large paper copy in exceptional contemporary French red morocco in the style of Le Gascon, covers double gilt ruled to a panel design, outer panel filled with a fine scrolled roll, middle panel with two fine dentelle scrolls elaborate fleurons to corners, central panel bordered with a small pointillé roll, elaborate corner pieces with scrolled and pointillé tools around a central oval worked to a lozenge form with fine scrolled tools, spine richly gilt with gilt ruled raised bands, double gilt ruled with further pontillé rules to compartments, richly gilt with scrolled tools and semé of small tools, edges with gilt dentelle roll, combed marble endpapers.

A fine, large paper copy of this most interesting contemporary biography of the feats of the great Scottish General, James Montrose, in a stunning contemporary morocco binding attributable or very close to the great French binder Le Gascon, from the exceptional library of Bolongaro-Crevenna. “Dr. George Wishart was born in 1599… In 1626 he moved to St. Andrews as second charge, and it has been conjectured that is was there that he first met the Earl of Montrose, who matriculated at the University of St. Andrews in 1627… When the Presbyterians obtained the ascendancy, Dr. Wishart fled to England with Archbishop Spottiswood. On 19th October 1639, he was appointed to a lectureship of All Saints Church, Newcastle, and in 1640 he was presented at St. Nicholas Church, Newcastle. When Leslie and the Scots army took Newcastle on 19th October 1644, Wishart was taken prisoner, and, on the charge of corresponding with royalists, was imprisoned in the Thieves’ Hole, Edinburgh. After 7 months in prison, Wishart was liberated when the Marquis of Montrose arrived in Edinburgh after his victory at Kilsyth on 15th August 1645. Wishart joined the royal army at Bothwell, and was appointed private chaplain to the Marquis of Montrose. In this capacity he accompanied the Marquis in his campaign both at home and abroad, and his narrative of Montrose’s campaign is that of an eye-witness and biographer. It was first published in Amsterdam … 1647. When the Scottish Parliament tried Montrose in abstentia in 1649, Wishart’s book was brought as evidence against him. A bounty was pledged by Parliament and the Church of Scotland for his capture, and he was sentenced in abstentia to be hanged with Wishart’s book around his neck. The sentence was carried out in the following year after Montrose was captured and brought to Edinburgh.” The Wishart Society.

“Les reliures de Le Gascon sont de veritables objets d’art.” Edouard Rouveyre. ‘Connaissances nécessaires à un bibliophile.’ This binding is very similar in style and the tools are nearly identical to a binding attributed to Le Gascon in a Sotheby’s sale at Paris,  2011, sale PF1113, lot 51, the 1595 edition of the works of Montaigne. It shares the same oval centre surrounded by near identical scrolled tools and pointillé work. “The style of Le Gascon, so-called, was in vogue between the years 1640, and 1665” Herbert P. Horne ‘An Essay in the History of Gold-Tooled Bindings’.

The binding is also very similar in design and tools to another binding attributed to Le Gascon in the Tenschert Catalogue ‘Biblia Sacra’ 2004, no. 59, a Greek New Testament. Many of the best binders of the period imitated the work of Le Gascon, who was then at the height of fashion, and if this binding is not by Le Gascon or his atelier, it is by someone who was imitating him as closely as possible. The gilding and use of pointillé tools is particularly fine, the morocco is of the highest quality. As this is a large paper copy in a very rich binding, it was almost certainly made for presentation, though there is no indication of to whom.

A wonderful copy from the extraordinary library of Bolongaro-Crevenna, the francophile Italian merchant from Amsterdam, whose magnificent collection was sold in Paris between 1775 and 1793. This work was in his sale of History books in 1789 lot 6506; see ‘Catalogue des livres de la bibliothèque de M. Pierre Antoine Bologaro-Crevenna … Volume 4” Amsterdam, chez Changuion 1789.

L2211

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WESTON, Elizabeth Jane

UNRECORDED VERSE BY POETESS OF THE 1600s

Ad Serenissimum, Potentissimum, ac Invictissimum principem ac Dominum, Dn. Matthiam Secundum.

Liepzig, Valentin. Am Ende. 1612.

£5,400

FIRST EDITION. 4to. Four unnumbered leaves. (-)4, (last blank). Italic letter, some Roman. Title within typographical border with small woodcut ornament, woodcut initial, typographical headpieces, large grotesque woodcut tailpieces, early manuscript page numbering to outer blank corners. Light, even age browning (poor quality paper). A very good clean copy, unbound.

Extraordinarily rare first, and only separate edition of the final published poem of the Elizabethan and Jacobean poetess Elisabeth Weston, written in praise of Mathew II on his election as Holy Roman Emperor. This first edition of one of the earliest published female British poets is lacking, as far as we can see, to all British and American libraries.

Elizabeth Weston (1582 – 1612), poet, was born in London, but her recusant father was forced out of England in her infancy and settled at Brux near Prague. Her youthful Latin verses, chiefly dedicated to awakening sympathy for an impoverished widow and her orphaned daughter, attracted considerate attention and were admired by a humanistic circle including Scaliger, Heinsius, Gerrardius, Lipsius, and Dousa. Her works were collected and edited by the Silesian noble Georg Martin von Baldhoven, who printed them in 1602 together with his encomium of the author, at his own expense. Elizabeth was a considerable scholar, speaking and writing perfectly in English, Greek, Italian, Latin, German, and Czech.

Her poems consist of addresses to princes, including James I, who it is said had recommended her to the Emperor, together with epigrams, translation of Aesop and epistles to friends. Farnaby includes her works in his ‘Index Poeticus’ (1634), and Elizabeth is the only woman to appear in his list of distinguished Latin writers, past and present; Evelyn specifically mentions her poem in praise of typography. “The coronation encomium that Weston wrote for Matthew II on his election as Holy Roman Emperor in Frankfurt in 1612, just four months before she died, is far more ambitious (than her encomium to James I on his coronation). It opens with an extended simile in which Alexander the Great is compared, of course unfavourably, with Matthias, the greatest of kings, who has conquered ‘hearts, not only bodies’ (22-23). Unlike the Macedonian king, Matthias has shed no blood. The contrast continues in a series of five antitheses: Matthias has conquered through ‘bono pacis non belli … tumultu’; his victory is ‘pietatis opus … /Non feritatis,’ his preference is ‘Demulcere malos mavis quam sumere poenas’; he not surprisingly favours disarmament but quells armed uprisings and brings peace, not bloodshed (10-19). There follows a chronological list of Matthias’s successes: wresting kingdoms from his brother, Rudolf, obtaining the Germans’ votes to become Holy Roman Emperor, and finally establishing himself as ‘Monarcha mundi’ (27-31). Respecting tradition, Weston ends on a note of appeal and prays for his reign to last for centuries through his offspring, a pious wish since in 1612 the middle aged Emperor had none, although he had married the much younger Anna of Tyrol in the previous year, and she asks for it to extend ‘ab occasu … Solis ad ortum.’ Weston is using conventional vocabulary, yet in reversing the usual order, ‘from sunrise to sunset,’ ‘east to west’ she is foreshadowing her explicit appeal twelve lines on to wage war against the Turks, exterminating the ‘Mohammedan foes’ to the root. Only then will the true faith extend worldwide and the church take on greater power.” Brenda Hosington.

“The well-wrought verses of an unknown bard. Renaissance Englishwomen’s Latin poetry of praise and lament. Acta Conventus Neo-Latini Upsaliensis.Vol. I.” An exceptionally rare first edition of one of the earliest published British female poets; we have found no copy of this edition on Worldcat or in German libraries online.

Not in Shaaber or BM STC Ger. C17. See Cheney and Hosington, Introduction to the Collected Writings.

L1839

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SHAKESPEARE, William and FLETCHER, John

THE ONLY AVAILABLE SHAKESPEARE QUARTO?

The Two Noble Kinsmen Presented at the Blackfriars by the Kings Maiesties Servants, with Great Applause.

London, Thomas Cotes, for John Waterson, 1634.

£125,000

FIRST EDITION, 4to. pp. (ii), 88, (ii). pi1(=N2), B-M4, N1. Roman letter, some Italic. Woodcut printer’s device on title, typographical headpiece and opening initial, Selbourne library stamp just touching text on verso of title and H2 recto, note on front endpaper “Halliwell’s Sale. May 1856. Lot 331. William Tite,” with note in another hand “This binding cost me £1.18.0.” Light age yellowing, title fractionally dusty, small rust hole to G4 touching two letters, signature letter of B3 just shaved in lower margin, very small repairs to gutter of title, small hole repaired in blank margin of M2, blank outer corner repaired on last two leaves. A very good, crisp copy in fine C19th red morocco by Bedford, covers bordered with double gilt rule, spine with gilt ruled raised bands, fleurons gilt to centres, edges gilt ruled, inner dentelles richly gilt, all edges red, extremities fractionally rubbed.

Exceptionally rare and important first edition, the only quarto edition, printed by Thomas Cotes who was also the printer of Fletcher’s ‘The Faithful Shepherdess’ (1629) and Shakespeare’s ‘Poems’ (1640). The play had not been included in the first folio of 1623, and did not find its way into the subsequent Shakespeare folios; but the quarto edition became the basis of the 1679 Beaumont and Fletcher folio text. The title states that it was ‘written by the memorable worthies of their time; Mr. Iohn Fletcher, and Mr. William Shakespeare. Gent,’ and modern scholarship has identified Shakespeare as the author of act I, act II scene 1, and act V.

Fletcher collaborated regularly with Beaumont, however this collaborative work between Fletcher and Shakespeare is unique. Based on Chaucer’s ‘Knight’s Tale,’ it was produced in either 1613 or 1614. ‘The Two Noble Kinsmen’ is set in ancient Greece during a war between Athens and Thebes. The narrative follows the title characters, Palamon and Arcite, noble youths whose friendship is destroyed by their mutual love for the beautiful Emilia. The subplot deals with the love and eventual madness of the Gaoler’s Daughter, who falls hopelessly in love with Palamon. The play also has echoes of ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream,’ as two of the major characters, Theseus and Hippolyta, also appear in the earlier play. The Rivals, a popular adaptation of the play by William D’Avenant, appeared in 1668 and 1669.

“The titlepage of The Two Noble Kinsmen states that it was ‘written by the memorable worthies of their time; Mr. Iohn Fletcher, and Mr. William Shakespeare. Gent’. Shakespeare has been identified as the author of act I, act II scene 1, and act V. The play was created in 1613 or 1614. The morris dance in act III scene 5 is related to the second antimasque dance in Francis Beaumont’s The Masque of the Inner Temple and Grayes Inne. The masque was performed as part of the wedding celebrations for James I’s daughter Elizabeth and Frederick, Elector Palatine on 20 February 1613. The name of Palamon, one of the principal characters in The Two Noble Kinsmen, is referred to in Ben Jonson’s Bartholomew Fair, first performed on 31 October 1614.The title-page of the quarto states that The Two Noble Kinsmen was ‘presented at the Blackfriars by the Kings Maiesties servants.’ A reference to ‘our losses’ in the play’s prologue suggests that it was written after the Globe burnt down on 29 June 1613. So it was perhaps written specifically for the Blackfriars playhouse. The Two Noble Kinsmen may have been considered for performance at court in 1619-1620. The inclusion of the names of two hired men (Tucke and Curtis) in the quarto’s stage directions suggests another revival in 1625-1626, when both were with the King’s Men. It has been suggested that the roles of Palamon and Arcite were originally played by John Lowin and Richard Burbage. The much younger actors Nathan Field and Joseph Taylor may have been intended for the roles in the 1619-1620 performances. (The) quarto, 1634 is thought to have been printed from a scribal transcript, to which revisions were made for performances in 1613-1614 and a revival in 1625-1626.” British Library, “Shakespeare Quartos.”

This copy is presumably the one offered in the Tite sale in 1874, also in red morocco by Bedford., lot 2762, which was sold to Hazlitt. William Carew Hazlitt (1834-1913) was a bibliographer and Shakespeare collector, grandson of the essayist William Hazlitt. Hazlitt published extensively on early English literature and in 1878 Mr. Huth engaged W.C. Hazlitt and F.S. Ellis to catalog his collection, the former cataloging English works, and the latter foreign. Hazlitt was also an assiduous collector and gathered in the course of his lifetime an impressive library of Shakespeare works and source texts, the basis for his Shakespeare’s Library, published in six volumes in 1887, an early and important edition of the works. The collection, itself of great literary importance, was sold in New York, 1918.

First editions of Shakespeare quartos have always been the holy grail of bibliophiles and collectors of British literature, immensely sought after as the high water marks of British culture and world literature, especially as these ephemeral printings appear so rarely on the market. They are considerably rarer than the folios. A handsome copy of this wonderful and rare work with distinguished provenance.

ESTC S106283 STC 11075. Greg II, 492(a); Pforzheimer 899.

K31

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BROME, Richard

EXCEPTIONAL COPY OF THE FIRST EDITION, WITH IMPORTANT LIST OF PLAYERS’ NAMES IN MANUSCRIPT

The Antipodes: a Comedie. Acted in the Yeare 1638, by the Queenes Majesties Servants, at Salisbury Court in Fleet-street.

London, I. Okes, for Francis Constable, 1640.

£75,000

FIRST EDITION. 4to. 44 unnumbered leaves. A-L⁴. Roman letter, some Italic. Typographical headpieces, woodcut initials, Selbourne library stamp on verso of title and F4, ‘1687’ and ‘1658’ manuscript on F4, “Charles Hunees (?) His Booke” in early hand on verso of D3, extensive inscription in mid-seventeenth hand entirely inked over on margin of A2 verso, alongside the printed character list, on A4v, names of 14 actors in contemporary manuscript; “Scenæ / Antipodes = London” in the same hand below; Series of page numbers, on the upper left or upper right corners, small tear to lower margin of first four leaves. “Similar numbering in a comparable hand appears in a British Library copy of The Sparagus Garden (London, 1640) owned formerly by W. W. Greg.” Joshua J. McEvilla. Light age yellowing, cut a little short in lower margin, a few signatures and catchwords fractionally shaved, the occasional ink splash mark or spot. A very good copy in red crushed morocco ‘Jansenist’ by Riviere, circa 1900, title, author and date gilt on upper cover, edges gilt ruled, inner dentelles richly gilt, all edges gilt, marbled endpapers.

First edition, exceptionally rare, of Richard Brome’s best work, his comic masterpiece, with a most important, recently discovered, cast list in manuscript which “helps to illuminate the state of the Salisbury Court players in 1638, directly following the reopening of the theatres after several months of closures due to outbreaks of plague.” Joshua J. McEvilla, p. 171. ‘The Antipodes’ was first acted at Salisbury Court, in Fleet Street, in 1638. The main character, Peregrine, becomes obsessed with the travels of Mandeville to the point that it makes him ill. The Doctor, who undertakes to cure him, proposes that they should travel together to the Antipodes, telling him that the Antipodes under England are English “To the exterior show; but in their manners, Their carriage, and condition of life, Extremely contrary,” a place of inversions and reversals. He then gives his patient a strong sleeping potion, and conveys him to the house of a lord.

When Peregrine wakes, a play is acted before him to represent the manners of the Antipodes. Everything is performed in a contrary fashion to what is normal; two sergeants with drawn swords run from a gentleman who wishes them to arrest him; a lawyer refuses all fees; a citizen makes a complaint of a gentleman who will not cuckold him, etc., etc. At the conclusion of the play, Peregrine recovers his senses. The title page of this first edition states that the play was acted in 1638 by Queen Henrietta’s Men at the Salisbury Court Theatre, the regular troupe and venue for Brome’s dramas from 1637. Critics typically situate Richard Brome’s ‘The Antipodes’ in a satiric tradition of travel writing in the vein of Joseph Hall’s ‘Mundus Alter et Idem’ (1605), arguing that the play is allegorical and a travel drama which, in being a play, goes nowhere and everywhere.

“The Antipodes is a veritable tour de force. It is not surprising that the company at the Salisbury Court Theatre were prepared to go to court to wrest the play away from the Beestons at the Cockpit, claiming a prior right to stage it on account of a contract that they had allowed virtually to lapse during the plague months, when the theatres were closed. Brome claimed that the profits accruing to Queen Henrietta Maria’s Men, Richard Heton’s company at the Salisbury Court, were considerable, which suggests they had a popular success on their hands. That the play was available in print as a quarto two years after the initial performances again attests to its popularity. No other play by Brome has such an intricately woven dramatic fabric or is so layered in its satirical strategies and ways of creating meaning. A consequence of this is that The Antipodes has attracted more critical commentary than Brome’s other plays, where the sheer range of approaches intimates how dense the dramatic fabric is.” R. Cave, ‘The Antipodes, Critical Introduction.’

The early provenance of this copy is most intriguing. There is no direct evidence as to who wrote the list of players, though the manuscript on A2 might disclose this, however there is no doubt of the authenticity and the importance of the list. “These aspects of the book’s provenance, although noteworthy, are perhaps rendered immaterial by the self-validating nature of the cast list. As noted above, the Brome contract proceedings record the composition of the players at Salisbury Court at two historical instances. …  The membership of the company as specified by the Selboune list seems to correspond to the membership as suggested by the contract documents and the book’s title page. According to the title page, ‘The Antipodes’ was ‘Acted in the yeare 1638 by the Queenes Majesties Servants, at Salisbury Court in Fleet-street.’ Since nine of the players of the list were plaintiffs in the suit against Brome and since the players of the merger are on the list, the list appears to convey genuine information. … One aspect of the list which serves both to authenticate its fidelity as a piece of evidence and to expand scholarly knowledge of period drama is the way that it falls in line with an important dialogue from the late seventeenth century.

James Wright’s ‘Historia Histrionica: An Historical Account of the English-Stage’ (London, 1699) remains a cornerstone to scholars’ accounts of the playhouses of the Shakespearian stage. The cast list in Selbourne’s copy of ‘The Antipodes’ serves to authenticate one claim made in this oddly nostalgic piece. Trueman, when discoursing with another character, Lovewit, casts a glance back at the conditions of public playing in England before the outbreak of war. He notes that ‘Cartwright, and Wintershal belong’d to the private House in Salisbury-Court’ (B2r). Although Kathman has used this allusion as evidence, no solid piece of evidence has drawn William Wintershall and Cartwright, the younger, to the same playhouse at the same time. Where scholars have had to rely on Wright’s memory in order to argue that these players were colleagues, the Selbourne list establishes that they played together at Salisbury Court.”

Joshua J. McEvilla suggests that the numbering of the pages is in the hand of the great Shakespeare scholar W. W. Greg, and was perhaps bound in a collection of other works in his library. His greatest achievement, among many, was ‘A Bibliography of the English Printed Drama to the Restoration,’ published in four volumes between 1939 and 1959. This work is exceptionally rare on the market with only one other copy in auction records. An exceptionally important copy.

STC 3818. ESTC S106712. Pforzheimer 106. Not in Lowndes or Grolier. For an in depth discussion of the list of players names see Joshua J. McEvilla, ‘The Original Salisbury Court Players of Richard Brome’s The Antipodes’, Notes and Queries, 2012.

K30

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MILLER, Thomas

Turner and Girtin’s Picturesque Views, Sixty Years Since.

London, J. Hogarth, 1854.

£200

Imperial 8vo. (lx) 164 + 30 engravings on copper. Publisher’s red, half-morocco with gilt back, minimal browning to plate edges, boards slightly discoloured in places. A nice copy.

The first re-printing (third state) of Turner and Thomas Girtin’s thirty contributions to the “Copper-Plate Magazine” (1794-98), the second states of which appeared in the “Itinerant” (1798). Thomas Miller in his preface describes the recovery of the original plates and the efforts required to clean and prepare the plates for this 1854 edition. In 1873, a second re-print was undertaken (fourth state; Rawnlinson, Reprint B), but the results were poor. The volume includes important, early biographies of both artists. The full page views are the earliest engravings after Turner and Girtin. The book is “worth having” (Muir, p.81).

Rawlinson, vol I 1-15a, reprint A.

X66

RAWLEY, William (ed.)

Resuscitatio, or bringing into Publick Light severall Pieces of the Works hitherto Sleeping; of the Right Honourable Francis Bacon. (with) Several Letters written by this Honourable Author.

London, S.G. and B.G. for William Lee, 1671.

£500

FIRST COMPLETE EDITION. Folio. Portrait of the author + pp. (xiv) 1-16, (+1 full page engraved portrait of the author) 17, 256 (ii), 100 (xviii), 8 (ii), 16 (ii), 1-19 (ii), 19-26 (ii), 27-62 (iv), 58 (viii), 92 (xiv), 26, lacking final blank H2. Roman and italic letter, head-and tail- pieces, woodcut initials, two portraits of the author by Wenceslas Hollar (unsigned Gibson listed l and m). C19 bookplate of John Gordon, Vescount Kenmure and Lord Lochinvar. Early manuscript monogram to verso of frontispiece engraving and title page “DPAH”(?). Frontispiece and title page slightly shaved at head with no loss, first and last gatherings a bit dusty and frayed at edges. Light age yellowing, well margined. In contemporary calf, covers ruled in blind, corners worn, small tears, joints cracked and frayed.

Gibson 229.

B53

RAWLEY, William (ed.)

Resuscitatio, or bringing into Publick Light severall Pieces of the Works hitherto Sleeping; of the Right Honourable Francis Bacon. (with) Several Letters written by this Honourable Author.

London, Sarah Griffin for William Lee, 1661.

£650

Folio. Portrait of the author + (xxiv) 324, (ii) 122 (ii). Roman and italic letter, head- and tail-pieces, folio author portrait by Wenceslas Hollar (Gibson portrait l), frontispiece and title page ruled in red, lower margins repaired with no loss of text or image, first gathering with slight damp stains to margin, otherwise a good, well-margined copy with light age yellowing. C19 bookplate of James Francis Anderton to pastedown, bound in C18 half calf, paper boards, re-backed.

Gibson 227.

B46

RAWLEY, William (ed.)

Resuscitatio, or bringing into Publick Light severall Pieces of the Works hitherto Sleeping; of the Right Honourable Francis Bacon. (with) Several Letters written by this Honourable Author.

London, Sarah Griffin for William Lee, 1657.

£1,250

FIRST EDITION Folio. Authorial engraved portrait + pp. (xxiv) 282 (ii), (ii) 122 (ii). Roman and italic letter, head- and tail-pieces, woodcut initials. Age yellowing, title page a bit dusty, a clean, well-margined copy in contemporary calf with blind-ruled panels, rebacked, lower cover edges worn. Heber stamp on fly.

Gibson 226.

B41

LOCKE, John and BACON, Francis

Locke’s Conduct of the Understanding and Bacon’s Essays.

London, J. Walker, 1818.

£75

24mo. (xii) 262. Engraved double-page frontispiece. Slightly foxed throughout, a good copy in contemporary diced calf by Newby joints worn, marbled end papers and edges.

B76

DELEYNE, Alexandre (ed.)

Analyse de la Philosophie du Chancelier Francois Bacon.

Leiden, Les Libraires Associes, 1756.

£150

8vo. In two volumes pp. (iv) 416 (ii), (ii) 433 (iii). Final leaf of volume II repaired at upper edge without loss, F4 margins torn, printing inserted wrong way around, both volumes lightly yellowed but well margined and good. In quarter calf C1800 marbled boards and end papers, edges speckled blue. Edited by Deleyne, second edition.

B67