TORNAMIRA, Francisco Vicente de

SPANISH INTERPRETATION OF THE NATURE OF THE UNIVERSE

Chronographia, y repertorio de los tiempos.

Pamplona, Tomás Porralis, 1585.

£5,250

FIRST EDITION. 4to., pp. (8), 560, (8). Roman letter; printer’s device on title and final verso, foliated initials, first historiated ‘A’ with charming Dance Macabre, numerous large astronomical woodcut illustrations, tables and diagrams, original correction slip pasted at foot of p. 60; browned in places. A good copy in eighteenth-century half vellum stained to resemble calf, spine gilt in compartments, marbled boards and endpapers, all edges blue; early ‘SE’ ink stamp at foot of title.

Rare first edition of a wide-ranging astronomical, cosmographical and historical book, one of the first of its kind to be directly written in Spanish. Little is known of the life of Francisco Vicente de Tornamira (1534 – 1597), born in Tudela, Navarre. Chronographia was the most influential work of this prominent Spanish astronomer, illustrating in 162 chapters the creation of the universe, the various branches of philosophy, the movement of planets, the constellations and the Zodiac, the universal chronology realm by realm, a series of calendars, almanacs and weather forecasts. All the subjects were elucidated further with a large number of illustrations, including, most notably, a traditional depiction of the Armillary Sphere and other globes, the Astronomical Man and the Roman gods on their chariots representing the planets named after them.

A fervent supporter of Ptolemaic vision of the universe against the heliocentric theory, Tornamira comes up with convoluted explanations to bridge the gap between mathematical calculation and the traditional model of planetary movement. A most interesting part is devoted to the solar calendar and the recent reform introduced in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII, discussing the exact days of the year in which Lent, Corpus Domini and Easter should be celebrated. Tornamira expanded on this topic in his subsequent work, the Spanish translation of the new Gregorian calendar (1591).

“On p. 40 there is a reference to the Magellan circumnavigation; on p. 497 a list of the midsummer’s days of the New World; on p. 538-539 locations of New World cities.” Alden 585/67.

Rare outside Spain. Only one recorded copy in the US (New York Public Library).

Not in Brunet. BM STC Sp., 204; Adams, T 803; Graesse, VII, 174; Houzeau & Lancaster 2763; Palau 334501. Cantamessa III 8057.

L2100

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CAVENDISH, William. Earl of Devonshire. HOBBES, Thomas (?)

PHILOSOPHICAL COMMENTARY ON HUMAN BEHAVIOUR, THE CO-AUTHORS COPY

Horæ subseciuæ. Observations and discovrses.

London, [Eliot’s Court Press] for Edward Blount, 1620.

[£12,500]

FIRST EDITION. 8vo. pp. (viii), 222, (iv), 223-324, (ii), 325-417, (iii), 419-503, (iii), 505-542. A⁴ B-X⁸ Y⁴ Z-2K⁸ 2L-2M⁴ 2N-2O⁸. Roman letter. Title and text within double box rule, floriated woodcut initials and typographical headpieces, “The Earle of Devonshires Book, Pre: 10 R.E.” (probably Richard Evelyn, father of the celebrated John) and other early annotations in early hand on front fly, later inscriptions with various Latin and English mottos, ‘C.J.’ initialed at head of title. Light age yellowing, the very rare marginal spot. A very good copy, crisp and clean in contemporary calf, spine bordered with gilt and blind rules large arabesque gilt to centers, spine rebacked to match, gilt and blind ruled in compartments with central fleurons gilt, new endpapers, lozenge on rear cover half chipped away and finely restored.

Rare, first and only edition of these important essays by William Cavendish, deeply influenced by Montaigne and Bacon, with the first edition of three discourses now attributed to Thomas Hobbes, Cavendish’s tutor, and thus the first edition of some of Hobbes’ earliest works. “Hobbes’s first discussions of substantive moral issues drew on these (skeptical) ideas, particularly as put forward by Bacon. … Hobbes and his pupils in the Devonshire household followed this precedent in a highly Baconian, and Montaigne-like, set of essays that they appear to have composed between 1610 and 1640. … The earliest example is a long ‘Discourse against flatterie’ which was published in 1611. This was an earlier version of a discourse with the same name which appeared in a group of four discourses as an adjunct to a collection of very Baconian essays, in an anonymous volume entitled Horae Subsecivae in 1620.

The essays (it is known from a manuscript at Chatsworth) were by William Cavendish, later the second earl, and Hobbes’s first ‘pupil’ (though that is rather a misnomer – Cavendish was only two years younger than Hobbes, had graduated from Cambridge the same year that Hobbes graduated from Oxford, and became his ‘tutor’ and had married the same year.) The ‘Discourse against flatterie’ is dedicated to Cavendish’s father in law in terms that are entirely appropriate for Cavendish himself. … The MS volume of Essayes at Chatsworth is dedicated by ‘Your Lordships most observant and dutiful sonne W. Cavendishe’ presumably to the first Earl by his son, Hobbes’ pupil, in Venice. The MS is in Hobbes’ hand and also contains some annotations by Hobbes. This not need mean very much however … clearly it was a matter of some indifference whether Hobbes or his pupil wrote out these treatises. …

(The essays and discourses are very important) as evidence for the intellectual life within the Cavendish household, and for the context out of which (at the very least) Hobbes’s own ideas developed. Hobbesian themes surface in these essays and discourses, however, and there seems to have been a complex intellectual relationship between Hobbes and his pupil.” Tom Sorell, ‘The Cambridge Companion to Hobbes.’

The three discourses, ‘A Discourse of Lawes’, ‘A Discourse of Rome’, and ‘A Discourse upon the beginning of Tacitus’ have now been more clearly established to be by Hobbes himself. “That the Horae Subsecivae had its origins in the Cavandish household and that Sir William Cavendish penned the ‘Observations’ and the ‘Discourse against Flattery’ published therein is certain. From the style, it is abundantly clear that the author of the three discourses now attributed to Hobbes was someone other than the author of the ‘Observations’ … and the three remaining discourses are in the style, and to some degree in the mode of argument strikingly similar to the later works of Hobbes. These discourses have recently been republished in a critical edition ‘Three discourses: A Critical Modern Edition of Newly Identified Work of the Young Hobbes.’ ed. Noel B. Reynolds…” Paul A. Rahe. ‘Against Throne and Altar: Machiavelli and Political Theory Under the English.’ 

A very good copy of this rare work; ABPC records no copies sold at auction, and ESTC gives only four locations for the work in US libraries, at Folger, Huntington, New York Society and Northwestern University.

ESTC S105996. STC 3957.

L1714

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RAWLEY, William (ed.)

Resuscitatio, or bringing into Publick Light severall Pieces of the Works hitherto Sleeping; of the Right Honourable Francis Bacon. (with) Several Letters written by this Honourable Author.

London, S.G. and B.G. for William Lee, 1671.

£500

FIRST COMPLETE EDITION. Folio. Portrait of the author + pp. (xiv) 1-16, (+1 full page engraved portrait of the author) 17, 256 (ii), 100 (xviii), 8 (ii), 16 (ii), 1-19 (ii), 19-26 (ii), 27-62 (iv), 58 (viii), 92 (xiv), 26, lacking final blank H2. Roman and italic letter, head-and tail- pieces, woodcut initials, two portraits of the author by Wenceslas Hollar (unsigned Gibson listed l and m). C19 bookplate of John Gordon, Vescount Kenmure and Lord Lochinvar. Early manuscript monogram to verso of frontispiece engraving and title page “DPAH”(?). Frontispiece and title page slightly shaved at head with no loss, first and last gatherings a bit dusty and frayed at edges. Light age yellowing, well margined. In contemporary calf, covers ruled in blind, corners worn, small tears, joints cracked and frayed.

Gibson 229.

B53

RAWLEY, William (ed.)

Resuscitatio, or bringing into Publick Light severall Pieces of the Works hitherto Sleeping; of the Right Honourable Francis Bacon. (with) Several Letters written by this Honourable Author.

London, Sarah Griffin for William Lee, 1661.

£650

Folio. Portrait of the author + (xxiv) 324, (ii) 122 (ii). Roman and italic letter, head- and tail-pieces, folio author portrait by Wenceslas Hollar (Gibson portrait l), frontispiece and title page ruled in red, lower margins repaired with no loss of text or image, first gathering with slight damp stains to margin, otherwise a good, well-margined copy with light age yellowing. C19 bookplate of James Francis Anderton to pastedown, bound in C18 half calf, paper boards, re-backed.

Gibson 227.

B46

RAWLEY, William (ed.)

Resuscitatio, or bringing into Publick Light severall Pieces of the Works hitherto Sleeping; of the Right Honourable Francis Bacon. (with) Several Letters written by this Honourable Author.

London, Sarah Griffin for William Lee, 1657.

£1,250

FIRST EDITION Folio. Authorial engraved portrait + pp. (xxiv) 282 (ii), (ii) 122 (ii). Roman and italic letter, head- and tail-pieces, woodcut initials. Age yellowing, title page a bit dusty, a clean, well-margined copy in contemporary calf with blind-ruled panels, rebacked, lower cover edges worn. Heber stamp on fly.

Gibson 226.

B41

LOCKE, John and BACON, Francis

Locke’s Conduct of the Understanding and Bacon’s Essays.

London, J. Walker, 1818.

£75

24mo. (xii) 262. Engraved double-page frontispiece. Slightly foxed throughout, a good copy in contemporary diced calf by Newby joints worn, marbled end papers and edges.

B76

DELEYNE, Alexandre (ed.)

Analyse de la Philosophie du Chancelier Francois Bacon.

Leiden, Les Libraires Associes, 1756.

£150

8vo. In two volumes pp. (iv) 416 (ii), (ii) 433 (iii). Final leaf of volume II repaired at upper edge without loss, F4 margins torn, printing inserted wrong way around, both volumes lightly yellowed but well margined and good. In quarter calf C1800 marbled boards and end papers, edges speckled blue. Edited by Deleyne, second edition.

B67

BACON, Francis

Fables of the Ancients, in Philosophy, Morality, and Civil Policy; Illustrated and Explained. A New Edition, With Notes Critical and Explanatory, by Dr. Shaw.

London, Thomas Tegg and J. Dick, 1813.

£75

8vo., pp. (ix) 10-44. Roman letter, undecorated. Twelve spirited woodcut plates illustrating the text. A little yellowing and the odd mark. A good clean copy in its original paper boards, publisher’s advertisement on rear cover, very old cloth re-back.

B74

BACON, Francis

Verulamiana; or opinions on Men, Manners, Literature, Politics and Theology.

London, R. Dutton, T. Hurst, John Cawthorn, 1803.

£150

FIRST EDITION. 8vo. pp. Engraved authorial portrait + (xxviii) 319. Roman and italic letter. Light age yellowing, a good, clean, well-margined copy in contemporary quarter-Russia marbled boards, spine gilt-ruled in six compartments.

B72

BACON, Francis

Fables of the Ancients, in Philosophy, Morality, and Civil Policy; Illustrated and Explained.

London, J. Cundee for M. Jones, 1803.

£75

8vo., frontispiece, pp. (vi) 136. Roman letter, finely engraved portrait of Bacon by H. Cook, woodcut illustrations (plates) and ornaments. Frontispiece a bit stained from bookplate glue on recto, light yellowing. A good almost uncut copy in modern calf. Contemporary autograph of John R on first leaf, and H.M. Silvanus 1891 (mathematician and chess player) on fly. A ‘new edition’ by Dr. Shaw.

B70