DEVEREUX, Robert

IRISH MILITARY CONDUCT, A GUIDE

Lawes and orders of warre, established for the good conduct of the seruice in Ireland.

London, Christopher Barker (?), 1599 (?).

£3,950

FIRST EDITION. 4to., pp. 10. (lacking last blank). Roman letter. A large historiated woodcut initial and woodcut headpiece. Recto of A1 and last leaf dusty, the odd marginal spot or mark, minor repair to upper outer corner of first and last leaf. A good copy in modern three-quarter calf over marbled paper boards, spine with gilt title.

Extremely rare and most interesting pamphlet published by Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex, on the eve of his campaign in Ireland in 1599, the largest expeditionary force ever sent to Ireland with over 16,000 troops. Essex had orders to put an end to the Irish rebellion and departed London to the cheers of crowds. It was expected that the rebellion would be crushed instantly. Essex had declared to the Privy Council that he would confront O’Neill in Ulster. Instead, he led his army into southern Ireland, where he fought a series of inconclusive engagements, wasted his funds, and dispersed his army into garrisons, while the Irish won two important battles in other parts of the country. Rather than face O’Neill in battle, Essex entered a truce that some considered humiliating to the Crown and to the detriment of English authority. The Queen herself told Essex that if she had wished to abandon Ireland, it would scarcely have been necessary to send him there.

The thirty seven orders given in this pamphlet are of great interest for military historians, and are designed specifically for troops in Ireland. Essex prefaces the work with a short introduction, stating ‘And military discipline cannot bee kept where the rules or chiefe partes thereof bee not certainly set downe and generally knowen.’ The first orders include directions requiring troops to attend sermons, morning and evening prayer, to respect the ‘holy and blessed Trinitie.’ Many of the orders have a specific Irish connection and reflect the difficulties facing an invading force that needs both to maintain good relations with and simultaneously to discourage sympathy or collusion with the local population.

“No Souldier of the Armie shall do violence to the person, or steale, or violently take, or wilfully spoyle the goods of any Irish good subject, upon paine of death,” and “No man wether hee be souldier or other, English or Irish, shal have conference or intelligence with any enemy or Rebell, that is in open action against her Maiestie.” Many of the orders are of great social interest and concern such things as drunkenness and adultery; “No man shall ravish or force any woman, upon paine of death. And adulteries or fornications shal be punished by imprisonment,’ or “No Souldier serving on Foote, shall carrie any Boy, nor no Woman shall bee suffered to follow the Armie.”

This work is particularly rare. ESTC lists only one copy held in libraries in the USA, at the Huntington Library and ABPC records no copy at auction.

ESTC S107432. STC 14131. USTC 513940. Not in Cockle.

L2065

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CAREW, Thomas

TRAVELS IN WAR TIME

Itinerarium R.D. Thomae Carue Tripperariensis …. cum histori facti Butleri, Gordon, Lesley & aliorum – (with) Itinerarium, Pars Altera.

Mainz, Nicolaus Heyll, 1640 and 1641.

£2,950

12mo. Two volumes. 1) pp. (xxxii), 328, (vi). 2) (xxiv), 370, (xiv) (last two leaves blank). Roman letter, some Italic. Floriated initials, woodcut and typographical ornaments, “Ad Biblioth; aul; Eystettensem” in early hand on half title of first volume. Light age yellowing, the very rare marginal spot. Very good copies in C19th dark blue, fine grained, morocco, covers gilt ruled to a panel design, vine leaf fleurons gilt to outer corners, large central fleuron gilt of vase and flowers, spine with raised bands richly gilt in compartments with large ‘holy dove’ tools to centers, all edges gilt, extremities rubbed.

Very rare, second issue of the first part, and first edition of the second part of Thomas Carew’s most interesting and important work, a first hand description of his travels and experience as Chaplain to Walter Butler and Walter Devereux of the Scottish-Irish regiment in Germany, of capital importance for the history of the Thirty Years’ War.

Carew “took priest’s orders and appears to have been stationed in the diocese of Leighlin. He left Ireland for Germany, and having stayed as chaplain for four years with Walter Butler (d. 1634), a kinsman of the Marquis of Ormonde, then serving as colonel of an Irish regiment in the army of Ferdinand II of Austria, he returned to his native country. In 1630 he again set out on his travels, and at this date his curious and valuable ‘Itinerary’ was begun. He remained with Walter Butler for two years, and returned at the period of the battle of Lützen; but after a short visit to his friends in Ireland he started again for Germany in 1633. On arriving at Stuttgart about September 1634 he heard of the death of his patron Walter Butler, and he transferred his services as chaplain to Walter Devereux, formerly the chief officer and now the successor of Butler. He accompanied the army of Charles III, duke of Lorraine, in its incessant movements, and afterwards joined the main forces under Gallas.

In April 1639 he finished the first part of his ‘Itinerary,’ and had it printed at Mainz, with a dedication to the Marquis of Ormonde, in which he says: ‘Not in the quiet chamber of study has it been composed, but beneath the tents of war, where my busy pen found no peace from the ominous clangour of the hoarse trumpet and the loud roll of the battle-drum; where my ear was stunned by the dreadful thunder of the cannon, and the fatal leaden hail hissed round the paper on which I was writing.’ In 1640 he was appointed chaplain-general of all the English, Scotch, and Irish forces, and in that capacity continued to serve with the army after the death of Devereux. It is probable that about 1643 he went to reside at Vienna in his character of notary apostolic and vicar-choral of St. Stephen’s Cathedral in that city. All his works are extremely rare.” Catholic Encyclopaedia. He published a fourth part of his Itinerary in 1646 which is mythically rare.

The provenance ‘ad Bibliothecam aulicam Eystettensem’ refers to the Library of the Dominican Monastery in Eichstaat, founded in the thirteenth century, which had an important collection of early printings. An excellent copy of this rare and most interesting work.

BM STC Ger C17 Vol I C304 and C306.

L2063

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APPIAN

IN SPLENDID CONTEMPORARY MOROCCO

Delle guerre civili (with) Delle guerre esterne

Florence (with) Venice, Heirs of Filippo Giunta (with) Nicolò Zoppino, 1526.

£16,500

8vo, 2 works in one: 1): ff. 287, (1); 2): ff. 191, (1). Italic letter; printer’s device to title 1 and at end of each work; title 2 within detailed woodcut border with mythological subjects including Apollo and Marsyas; manuscript inscription crudely washed from title 1 leaving two marginal stains, light waterstains to fore-edge in places in central and final gatherings. A very good, well margined copy in splendid Italian contemporary dark-brown morocco made in Bologna (see  M. Foot, The Henry Davis Gift, III, no. 282) and traditionally regarded as for Francis I, King of France (1515-1547); gilt interlacing borders with square knots to corners, eight small lunettes, central panel with gilt title and blind-tooled motto in oval, four flower bunches to corners, gilt nerves on spine; joints slightly cracked; all edges gauffered; label of George Dunn (1865-1912) on front pastedown.

An exquisitely bound copy of the first Italian translation of Appian’s account of Rome’s expansion and civil wars. Appian of Alexandria (c.95-165 AD) was a Greek historian as well as a renowned lawyer in Rome and administrator of the imperial province of Egypt. Only half of his 24 books on Roman history survive, the most relevant being the five volumes devoted to the Roman civil wars. These are gathered in the first book, offering an invaluable picture of the internal fights which marked the twilight of the Roman Republic, from the Gracchus Brothers’ reforms to the victory of Augustus over Marc Antony. The second book comprises Appian’s chronicle of the wars fought by the Romans against Carthage, Antioch III of Syria, Mithridates VI of Pontus and the Parthian Empire in the East, including some interesting ethnographical digressions. Alessandro Braccesi or Bracci (1445-1503) was secretary to both the Medici regime and the Republic of Florence, until Machiavelli took over his office. He published three collections of his Latin and vernacular poems, though his major effort was the translation of large part of Appian into Italian. Braccesi himself looked after the publication of the four books on the external wars in Rome in 1502 (the edition bears a Latin title). Delle guerre civili was published in 1519 by the Giunta of Florence. Ignorant of Greek, Braccesi worked on Decemberio’s Latin version of Appian. His influential translation was expanded and reprinted several times over the sixteenth century.

While the motto ‘et io del mio dolor ministro fui’ on the rear cover is drawn from Petrarch’s Trionfi, the love verses stamped on the front ‘ardo in foco d’amor lieta et contenta’ are more puzzling and not attested anywhere else. Earlier sale catalogues starting from Gancia 1868 (lot 960) connected it to the salamander shrouded in flames, symbol of the French King Francis I. Its motto, however, was ‘Nutrisco et extinguo’ or in Italian ‘Nutrisco al bono, stringo al reo’, referring to justice rather than love. Although the design resembles that of another Italian binding commissioned by Francis for his famous library in Fontainebleau (see A. Hobson, Humanist and Bookbinder, no. 144), this seems insufficient to ascribe this beautiful Italian 1520s binding to the French king in particular.

‘George Dunn (1864-1912), of Woolley Hall, Maidenhead was a keen student of palaeography and early printing (…) and it is much to be regretted that his choice and extensive library should have dispersed at auction. During a number of years he had been a generous and systematic buyer, collecting early English law books (…) medieval manuscripts (…) early-printed books (…) and lastly, early stamped bindings, which he was one of the first collectors to notice and preserve.’ S. De Ricci, English Collectors, pp. 182-183.

1) Not in Adams or Graesse. BM STC It., 35; Brunet, I, 358.

2) Not in Adams or BM STC It.  Brunet, I, 358 ; Graesse, I, 169.

L1991

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APPIANUS, Alexandrinus with FONTAINE, Jacques with ALTHAMER, Andreas

ON THE WARS THAT LED TO THE DEMISE OF ROME AND RHODES

De civilibus romanorum bellis historiarum libri quinque et liber Illyricus & Celticus, Libycus & Syrius, Parthicus & Mithridaticus. (with) De Bello Rhodio libri tres. (with) Scholia in Cornelium Tacitum De situ, moribus, populisque Germaniae.

Mainz, Johannes Schöffer, 1529 (and) Hagenau, Johannes Setzer, 1527 (and) Nürnberg, Friedrich Peypus for Leonhard von Aich, 1529.

£4,950

4to, three works in one. 1) pp. [28], 723, [1]; 2) ff. [56], A-O4; 3) FIRST EDITION. ff. [4], 59, [9]. Predominantly neat Roman letter, some Italic in 3); titles within elegant ornamental and architectural borders, large printers’ device on colophons, few decorated initials; light marginal damp stain to first few leaves and in final gatherings, general age yellowing. A very good copy in beautiful contemporary German brown calf on thick-wooden board, decorative pattern typical of the Saxon area around 1530 (K. Rabenau, Deutsche Bucheinbände der Renaissance um Jakob Krause Hofbuchbinder des Kurfürsten August I. von Sachsen, 1994, esp. pls 7-8); richly blind-tooled, double fillet; on front cover, central panel with a naked standing Lucretia committing suicide under decorated arch, flowers to corners, stamped date and title ‘APIA: ALEXA’ and ‘MDXXIX’, external roll of all’antica motif, four gilt roses; spine crammed with tooled four-leaved clovers; original clasps; spine defective at foot; contemporary owner’s inscription on front pastedown ‘Rodolphus Zimermann’.

Beautifully bound collection of three uncommon works of the Renaissance. First the main Greek account of the Roman civil wars in the third and most popular sixteenth-century Latin edition. The ground-breaking translation by Pier Candido Decembrio of the princeps is here improved following a new collation of extant manuscripts. Appian of Alexandria (c.95-165 AD) was a Greek historian as well as a renowned lawyer in Rome and administrator of the imperial province of Egypt. Only half of his 24 books on Roman history survive, the most relevant part being the five volumes devoted to the Roman civil wars. They offer an invaluable picture of the internal fights marking the twilight of the Roman Republic. This edition also comprises the ethnographical books on Illyrians, Celts, Syrian, Parthians and Northern Anatolians (Mithridatici). 

Then follows the second edition of the account of the fall of Rhodes in 1522. The text, originally dedicated to pope Clemens VII, is introduced here by a plea addressed to the Archbishop-Elector of Mainz Albert of Brandenburg from Philipp Melanchton. Dwelling on the advance of the Turkish army in Europe, Melanchton strongly urges Albert, primate of Germany, to promote reformation, peace and religious reconciliation in the country, acknowledging the evangelical communities sprung from Luther’s recent break with Rome. Very little is known about Fontaine, except for the information he provided in this and other publications. A Flemish Knight of Rhodes, he acted as a judge in the local appeal court and was close to the vice-chancellor Giles Caoursin; he witnessed the siege by the Ottoman fleet and took part in the meetings between the Sultan and the Grand Master of the Knights after the capitulation of the island in December 1522. His first-hand report had enormous success, with several reprints and translations into Italian, French, German and Spanish (see A. Freeman, ‘Editions of Fontanus, De bello Rhodio’, The Library, 1969, ser. 5, XXIV, pp. 333-336).

Finally, the third part of this volume is taken up by the first edition of an erudite and patriotic commentary on Tacitus’s Germania, including the Latin text. The commentary is by the humanist and early Lutheran pastor Andreas Althamer (1500-1539).

1) BM STC Ger. 38; Adams, A 1344; Graesse, I, 169.

2) BM STC Ger. 310; Adams, F 719; Brunet, II, 1339-1331; Graesse, II, 612; Göllner, 278; Atabey, 445. Hartfelder, 199.

3) BM STC Ger. 848; Adams, T 47; Graesse, VII, 12.

L1935

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COMMINES, Philippe de

Historia delle guerre di Lodovico XI.

Venice, P. Geronimo Giglio, 1569.

£1,650

Small 8vo., ff. (xii) 248 (viii). Italic letter printer’s devices on title and at end, some woodcut initials and ornaments. Manuscript chapter index neatly added to table circa 1800 (?), bibliographical notes probably in same hand on fly. Upper margin a bit tight but clear of running title, a good clean copy in particularly attractive late C16 French purple morocco, covers with triple gilt border at central panel and edges, double gilt rules joining corners, narrow rectangular three line central panel with flower at each corner gilt on spine, edges of spine with three line gilt border, a.e.g.

Second edition of the first Italian translation of Commines’ history, first published in 1544. It is the work of Nicholas Raince, about whom we have discovered nothing, and dedicated to Giovio. It does not appear to have been subsequently reprinted and examples of both editions are scarce. The classical restraint of the severely geometric binding contrasts happily with the richness of the morocco in texture and colour.

A most attractive volume.

BM STC It. p. 192 (1st ed only). Adams C 2453 (UL copy only).

SN2102

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EUTROPIUS

AN ACCOUNT OF THE GALLIC WARS

Epitome Belli Gallici.

£3,750

Paris, Robert Estienne, 1544.

FIRST EDITION, 8vo., pp. (ii) 3-134 (civ). Mostly Italic, some Roman letter, a little Greek. Estienne’s woodcut Noli Alterum Sapere device on title page, woodcut diagram in text. Early manuscript price mark (?) on title page, contemporary manuscript annotation to K4. In a very handsome contemporary calf binding, covers ruled and panelled in blind, central section within border of ornate flowers and garlands, two medallion heads on panel within, vellum stubs. Lower cover with single but significant diagonal crack, very small repairs at head and tail of spine. A good, clean copy with wide margins, a.e.r.

The impressive contemporary calf binding of this copy strongly resembles Oldham HM23 “only one example is known” and is almost certainly English, though “many of the panels used in England no doubt came from the Netherlands” (Oldham p. 20). The text itself consists of a brief summary, the Epitome of the Gallic Wars, taken from Suetonius’ iconic work. Eutropius was a late Roman historian and secretary (magister memoriae) at Constantinople. Written in a straightforward narrative style, with none of the syntactical twists and turns of Suetonius’ original Latin, the text rattles through the most important campaigns waged by Julius Caesar during the Gallic and Civil Wars, moving on to his Dictatorship and death at the hands of the Senate in only a few pages.

This is followed by notes on the Commentary on Caesar’s Gallic and Civil Wars, by Henricus Glareanus: these consist of short summaries of each book and explanations of any obscure place names or peoples (e.g. the tribe known as the Sedusi who, Glareanus tells us, ‘non sunt Seduni see Germani’, referencing Pliny 4.17). Glareanus also explains, with a diagram, Caesar’s battle formation, and the various numbers of his troops. The work ends with four alphabetical indexes: the first refers back to Glareanus’ annotations on the commentary, the second gives the French equivalents of Roman place names and tribes mentioned in Caesar’s text; the third, longer notes on these places and tribes, and the fourth is an index of Caesar’s text itself. This beautifully bound edition must have been a very handy condensed textbook for any student of Caesar who had neither the time nor the inclination for the original work.

Renouard 60:13. Adams E1133 + pt C38. See also Goldschmidt LI.

L1853

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GAETANI, Enrico

ADVICE FOR A GENTLEMAN AT WAR

Instructions for Young Gentlemen.

Oxford, John Lichfield, 1633.

£2,350

FIRST ENGLISH EDITION. 12mo. pp. (viii) 122 (ii). Roman letter within double ruled line border; errata on recto of last. A very good, clean wide-margined copy in contemporary limp vellum, later vellum superimposed over spine, lacking ties. Acquisition note of Thomas Clifford 1647, 1s 3d, to rear free endpaper.

A translation of an untraced original, subtitled “The instructions of Cardinall Sermonetta to his Cousen Petro Caetano, at his first going into Flanders to the Duke of Parma, to serve Philip, King of Spaine,” the work comprises a set of instructions to a young nobleman entering military and royal service. It begins with the necessity of maintaining regular communication by writing from every stopping place to both confirm his progress, report upon the state of the war and to find out what is to be done in service to the King. The need for discretion and secrecy in his letters is advised, as well as the keeping of detailed records to eliminate confusion. As well as sending letters of his own, it is vital that he answer fully all missives, using the cypher that he receives.

Cardinal Sermonetta advises his cousin to develop a close relationship with the postmaster, rewarding him intermittently for his continued good services so he would remain loyal and work with haste. Petro was evidently sent to Flanders at the desire of his father and was impelled to do his utmost to ensure the satisfaction of the Prince with his service, combining excellence in war and a thorough knowledge of the context in which hostilities had developed. It behooves him to demonstrate honour and an encyclopaedic knowledge of the state of affairs of the nation, topographically and socially as well as militarily. The Cardinal also encourages him to construct a dictionary of the terminology and tactics of warfare for his own use, and to participate as actively as possible in military life. Great emphasis is placed upon acting and speaking appropriately around the royals. The work concludes within a warning to always respect the sanctity of religious establishments, personages and artefacts, before commending him to God.

Here, the war in question is the Eighty Years’ War, the revolt of the Seventeen Provinces in the Low Countries against the Spanish (Habsburg) Empire. Shortly after the publication of this letter in 1639, Spain sent an Armada to Flanders carrying 20,000 troops to assist in a last large scale attempt to defeat the northern “rebels”. The Armada was defeated in the Battle of the Downs, marking the end of Spain as the dominant sea power.

Thomas Clifford, in ex libris, may well be the first Baron Clifford of Chudleigh (1630-1673), who probably acquired this work at the appropriate age of seventeen. He went on to distinguish himself in naval battles, including at the end of the Dutch War.

STC 11514, recording only 7 copies, BL, two at Oxford, one at Cambridge; Folger, Huntington and Yale in the US. Not in Lowndes.

L728

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CAPOBIANCO, Alessandro


Corona e Palma Militare di Arteglieria.

Venice, Giovanni Antonio Rampazetto, 1598.

£12,500

FIRST EDITION. folio, ff. [iv] 58. Roman letter; woodcut portrait of the author in his study with military apparatus on title-page, woodcut historiated initials, 95 woodcut illustrations in text, printer’s woodcut device on verso of last. C19 armorial bookplate of the Earl of Macclesfield on pastedown, Shirburn Castle blindstamp to first three ll, seventeenth-century inscription “Sutton Place”on flyleaf. Small ink splash to blank lower outer corner of t-p, title and verso of last fractionally dusty. A fine, crisp, very well margined copy (some fore-edges untrimmed), in high quality contemporary English tan calf, spine with raised bands gilt in compartments, covers gilt and blind ruled to a panel design, fleurons gilt at corners, gilt arabesque lozenge at centers, spine slightly worn at head and tail.

A fine copy of the first edition of this important, rare and profusely illustrated work by Capobianco, Captain of the Bombardiers of the city of Crema, that brings together all the technical advances in artillery in the C16, dedicated to Antonio Prioli (future Doge of Venice) and Lunardo Rossetti. By the middle of the 16th century Italian theorists and military architects had perfected the bastioned system of fortification and the Italian method was an admired standard throughout Europe. “During the sixteenth century the emphasis shifts South of the Alps. And after 1550 Italian military writers dominate the field to the point of monopoly.” (Horst de la Croix, ‘The Literature on Fortification in Renaissance Italy’.) The use of cannons against these new bastioned fortresses required new tactical thinking, which Capobianco elaborates in this work.

A veteran of many campaigns in both Italy and the Low Countries he was an expert gunner, though like many of his colleagues he was not a literary man, and his versatility and inventiveness are best shown by his plans and designs. A skilled bombardier, he presents the reader with a sweeping survey of the aims and techniques of artillery around the turn of the C16, starting with the technical use of cannon, their various types and specific purposes, the comparison of modern and ‘antique’ cannon, their manufacture, sighting etc. He then moves on to the tactics of artillery in defense and attack, the placement of cannons, their transportation, storage and the storage of munitions, the use of rockets and fireworks, and finishes with a brief but insightful description of ‘modern’ fortification, and bastion techniques.

The binding of this copy is identical in style, with the same central arabesque tool, to a book bound for Thomas Knyvett c. 1610, see David Pearson, English book binding styles 1450-1800, page 9, fig. 1.3. Sir Thomas Knyvett (1539-1618), barrister, of a leading Norfolk family with estates in Lincolnshire, Suffolk, Staffordshire and Yorkshire started to build his splendid collection after the first flood of books and manuscripts from the monastic libraries. At his death his library numbered approximately 1,400 titles and 70 manuscripts on various subjects, as recorded in his library catalogue now in Cambridge University Library, which also received much of his collection in 1715. Favouring original texts, he became proficient in many languages, nurturing a particular love of Italian, owning at least 80 Italian books. Never a very rich man, the size of his library is extraordinary for the period, and it is likely that many of his books were obtained second hand. This binding is typical of those bound for his collection.

Sutton Place, built in 1530 for Sir Richard Weston, is celebrated as a pioneer of the Renaissance style in England, an early Tudor House, innovative for the symmetry of its design and its Italianate terracotta decoration. It was later the home of J. Paul Getty.

Not in BM STC It. Index Aur. 131.683. Riccardi I, 232. Cockle 673.

L680

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CATANEO, Girolamo

THOMAS KNYVETT’S COPY


Nuovo Ragionamento del Fabricare le Fortezze. (with) Modo di formare con prestezza le moderne battaglie di picche, archibugieri, et cavalleria.

Brescia, Giovanni Francesco & Pietro Maria de’ Marchetti, 1571.

£3,750

FIRST and only early editions 4to., ff. [iv] 35 i.e. 34 ; [iv] 30 [i]. Two works in one, separate title pages to each. Roman letter, Aldine-style anchor and dolphin device to both title pages, illustrations and diagrams to both works, one double page to first, 3 double to second, woodcut initials and large ornaments. Three bifolia diagrams to first work unsewn as issued, first title page very slightly soiled. Very good unsophisticated copy in contemp. English calf, a bit rubbed, blind panel with gilt central and corner fleurons, spine gilt in compartments, morocco lettering piece, small restoration, lacking ties. C14th English vellum manuscript stub, rubricated, blue initial, C16th manuscript autographs of Thomas Knyvett in Italic and Secretary hands on first title page, armorial bookplate of the Earl of Macclesfield on pastedown, Shirburn castle blindstamp at head of first two leaves, early press mark inside front cover and classification on blank verso of last.

The first work is an argument on how to build fortresses to make them safer, both in theory and practice, a reminder of the prestige Cataneo enjoyed as a military architect and mathematician whose treatises had a powerful influence on military building across the Mediterranean and the coast of Africa. It also covers how to measure great distances. The second explains in great detail how to calculate the necessary numbers and arrange formations of pikemen, artillerymen and cavalry, how to march and be effective in battle, with the help of illustrations.

Sir Thomas Knyvett (1539-1618), barrister, of a leading Norfolk family with estates in Lincolnshire, Suffolk, Staffordshire and Yorkshire started to build his splendid collection after the first flood of books and manuscripts from the monastic libraries.

At his death his library numbered approximately 1,400 titles and 70 manuscripts on various subjects, as recorded in his library catalogue now in Cambridge University Library, which also received much of his collection in 1715. Favouring original texts, he became proficient in many languages, nurturing a particular love of Italian, owning at least 80 Italian books. Never a very rich man, the size of his library is extraordinary for the period, and it is likely that many of his books were obtained second hand. This binding is typical of those bound for his collection. Of the five works by Cataneo listed in his catalogue (which mentions this volume), none were later gifted to Cambridge.

i. BM STC It. 158. Riccardi I 315, 5. Cockle 779. IA 133.930. Censimento 16 CNCE 10303. Cat. Col. Bibl. Esp. C 1188. Not in Gamba or Adams.

L681

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PISTOFILO, Bonaventura

Oplomachia…e col mezzo delle figure si tratta per via di teorica, e di pratica del maneggio e dell’uso delle armi. Distinta in tre discorsi di Picca, d’Alabarda e di Moschetto.

Siena, Hercole Gori, 1621.

£7,950

FIRST EDITION, oblong 4to, pp. [viii], 1-64, 57-123, [i], 123-256, 253-315, [i]. Roman and italic letter, floriated initials, engraved t-p, Kenelm Digby’s and author’s portraits following ms. note on pastedown “1901 cat138 … L140”. A good clean copy in contemp limp vellum within vellum slipcase gilt stamped ‘Torre del Palasciano’, ms title on spine, lacks ties.

Rare first edition of this work on the use of pike, halberd and musket with 53 very precise and beautiful engravings, somewhat like Callot’s in style and fineness. 34 plates are dedicated to the pike, 4 to the halberd and 15 to the musket. they seemed to have been engraved by Bertelli (Francesco(?)), who worked at Padua between the end of the sixteenth and the beginning of the seventeenth centuries (Benezit). The text explains the history and use of each of these weapons and the particular action or manoeuvre depicted in each plate. Each of the figures illustrated is numbered, corresponding to a numbered paragraph of the explanatory text, making the manual of very practical application. Bonaventura Pistofilo from Pontremoli was a notary for the Este family, then chancellor to Duke Alfonso I d’Este, and a close friend of Ariosto. This work was dedicated to Sir Kenelm George Digby with his striking youthful portrait, probably done during his three years in Europe between 1620 and 1623. Digby (1603-1665) was an English author, diplomat, naval commander and one of the most fashionable figures of his day. He was known for his esoteric approach to science and advocacy of the “powder of sympathy”, a ‘healing’ powder of vitriol applied to a bandage taken from the wound which healed without any contact with the patient.

Ferdinando Palasciano (1815 – 1891) was an Italian physician and politician. He argued that any wounded or sick soldier was neutral on the battlefield and should be helped by any available doctor. Palasciano’s speech at the International Congress at the Accademia Pontoniana of Naples (1861), had widespread influence and was the basis of the First Geneva Convention which founded the Red Cross (1864).

Brunet, Suppl, II, p. 244: “89ff. Pour la Picca, 95 pour l’Allebarda, et 30 pour le Moschetto. Au 2e f., dans un encadrement, se trouve le portr. de George Digby, auquel le livre est dédié, et au 4e le portrait de l’auteur. Les gravures semblent avoir été gravées par Bertelli; il en faut 53, dont 34 pour l’exercice de la pique, 4 pour la hallebarde et 15 pour le mousquet” ; Graesse, V, p. 305 ;Gelli 277 “Beau volume très rare et recherché”; Thimm p.226; Cat.Vinciana 1457: «Uno dei più rari e importanti trattati di scherma, interessante per le 125 pittoresche posizioni di soldati in esercizio». Cockle 742.

L1503

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