GALLE, Theodore; ORSINI, Fulvio; FABER, Johannes

Illustrium imagines ex antiquis marmoribus, nomismatibus, et gemmis expressae, quae exstant Romae, maior pars apud Fulvium Ursinum

Antwerp, ex officina Plantiniana, 1606.

£3,250

FIRST EDITION thus. 4to. 2 parts in 1 vol.; 1) pp. 8 [iv], 151 engraved plates, pp. [iv], 17 engraved plates lettered A-R. 2) pp. (viii) 88 (vi). Five additional plates from another work. Roman and Italic letter. Finely engraved title-page with figures of ‘Cornucopiae’ on one side ‘Felix antiquitatas’ on the other, intricate early monogram finely stamped below, full-page engraved portrait of the author, 151+17 engraved plates, Plantin’s engraved printer’s device on second title-page, his woodcut printer’s device on final verso, with 5 additional similar engravings at end, ‘Joseph Lauthier’ inscribed at foot of first title-page, armorial bookplate of Oliver Pemberton on pastedown, Patricia A. Milne-Henderson’s booklabel above, armorial bookplate of Henry J.B. Clements of Killadoon, Ireland, on rear pastedown. Light age yellowing, t-p fractionally dusty, the occasional mark or spot. A very good, well margined copy in good contemporary French red morocco gilt, covers bordered with a double gilt rule, gilt central oval formed of leafy sprays, spine gilt ruled in compartments, gilt fleurons at centres, later black morocco labels gilt, extremities and joints a little worn, spine a little rubbed.

First edition of this important collection of portraits from antiquity with the commentary of Johannes Faber and with an additional 17 plates. Fulvio Orsini of Rome, 1529 – 1600 was a renowned antiquarian, collector of books and antiquities, particularly gems and portraits. Orsini published a number of his own ancient portraits, with commentary in his ‘Imagines et elogia virorum illustrium at eruditorum’ (Rome 1570). “Most of our knowledge about Orsini’s collection comes from the work of Dirk Galle (Gallaeus) who visited Rome in 1595 and made drawings of 240 portraits from Roman collections, especially that of Orsini. Galle engraved 151 of these for his own illustrium imagines (published by Plantin, Antwerp 1598), but Orsini was dissatisfied with the publication because it lacked a scholarly commentary. Orsini prepared notes for such a commentary but was unable to complete the work before he died, and the notes were taken over by Johanes Faber, a German physician and botanist to the Pope, who finally issued the commentary for the second edition of the work (Antwerp 1606). This book enlarged with seventeen additional reproductions, became the basic reference work on portrait iconography for two centuries… for this kind of work he (Orsini) is o en characterised today as the ‘father of ancient iconography.’ One of his most influential identifications however was later rejected. He was the first to identify the portrait of Seneca, from a bust in the Farnese collection; later he was proved wrong with the discovery of an inscribed portrait bust of Seneca in 1813.” Nancy Thomson de Grummond. ‘Encyclopedia of the History of Classical Archaeology.’

This work is extra illustrated with five further plates in the same style, unsigned but also probably by Galle and drawn from the Orsisni collection, with the manuscript title, Appendicula Nondam edita. They include a portrait of Pompeius Magnus, broken busts of Aristoteles, Euripides, and inscriptions concerning Menander and Homer.

The Joseph Lauthier autograph on the title is probably that of the Author of the work “Nouvelles Regles Pour Le Jeu De Mail,” published by C. Huguier & A. Cailleau, 1717 and translated into English the same year as ‘New rules for the game of Mail’. The Game of Mail or Pall Mall is one of the precursors of the game of Golf.

BM STC Low Countries 1601-1620 p. 218, G8.

L2366

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VITRUVIUS POLLIO, Marcus

De architectura libri decem … adiecimus etiam … Frontini de aequeductibus … item … Nicolai Cusani Card. de staticis experimentis.

Strasbourg, Georg Messerschmidt for Knobloch, 1543.

£3,250

4to, pp. [52], 262 [i.e. 260], [52]. Italic letter, little Greek; historiated initials, numerous illustrations, mainly architectural, some full-page; light marginal dampstain in first and final gatherings, tiny clean tear to margin of first four leaves and p. 29. A very good copy in c1600 English calf with blind ruled border and gilt lined edges; title label on spine, all edges red; extremities and spine slightly rubbed; c1900 armorial bookplate of Hopetoun House and ex libris slip of Bernard E. J. Pagel (1930-2007), FRS and astrophysicist, on front pastedown; two owner’s inscriptions on front fly, one 19 September 1636 largely scribbled over, the other mid-seventeenth century by ‘Guliellmum Lythall’, with ‘pretium 68’.

First German edition of the masterpiece of ancient architecture, designed to be easily handled by an architect or scholar rather than as a huge glamourous book. Vitruvius (80-70 BC, after 15 BC ) was an architect and military engineer. While very little is known about him, his Ten Books on Architecture, dedicated to Augustus, very early acquired universal fame. The text of this edition is carefully revised by the Alsatian humanist, physician and mathematician Walther Hermann Ryff (c.1500-1548), while the illustrations are generally based on the 1521 Como edition in Italian, showing a great deal of buildings, cities, ornaments as well as civil and military machineries, such as cranes, mills, catapults and battering rams. One can also find two woodcuts depicting the perfect symmetry and proportion of human male body through the famous Vitruvian Man, which was illustrated, i.a., by Leonardo. The edition ends with the work of Frontinus (c.40-103 AD) on the aqueducts of ancient Rome and Nicholas of Cusa’s treatise on statics (1450). The latter provides methods for measuring through the use of scales and water clock; for instance, it explains in detail how to determine the humidity of air by measuring the weight of wool.

This copy reached in England by 1636 and some years later was acquired by William Lythall, likely the Beadle of the Society of the Apothecaries of London, died ca. 1657. Afterwards, it entered the famous Hopetoun library, sold in 1889 by the 7th Earl of Hopetoun (see De Ricci, English Collectors, p. 164).

BM STC Ger., 958; Adams, V 906; Berlin Kat., 1806; Cicognara, 707; Fowler, 401.

L2191

LATIN

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CICERO, Marcus Tullius

Epistole famigliari.

Venice, Paolo Manuzio, 1554-1555.

£1,750

8vo, ff. 319, [1]. Italic letter; large printer’s device on title and, within floral border with putti, on last; occasionally lightly age yellowed, light damp stain to lower gutter of a few central gatherings. A very good copy in contemporary rustic limp vellum, contemporary title inked on spine; pasted stubs from fourteenth-century ms, remains of ties; slightly worn; contemporary ex libris of ‘Pompeo del Capellan’ at foot of final verso and couple of marginalia in his hand; inscriptions, drawings and scribbles, partly faint, by other contemporary hands on front and rear endpapers and flys and formerly on covers.

An interesting copy of the earliest influential Italian translation of a masterpiece of Latin literature, first published by the Aldine press in 1545. The translator, Guido Logli from Reggio, was a man of letters in service of the Farnese family and acted as agent of Paolo Manuzio in contracting the publication of some works of Annibal Caro and Girolamo Ruscelli. This edition is part of the ambitious plan pursued by Paolo Manuzio to provide his readership with the complete works of Cicero not only in Latin, but also the Italian vernacular.

The vast corpus of Ciceronian Epistolae and Orationes was for a long time used as foundation texts in early modern schools. Indeed, this copy bears an inscription of the otherwise unknown ‘Pompeo de’ Capellan’, written in a childish hand and employing Venetian dialect (‘Questo libro siè de mi’). The other inscriptions, scribbles and drawings – some only visible under UV lamp – by Pompeo or slightly later students comprise try-outs of Latin alphabet, a passage from the prayer to Virgin Mary (‘sancta Maria ora pro nobis’) and a formal address for a letter in Italian vernacular (‘Al Mag.co sig.or Manoli amico et come patron mio sempre osser[vantissimo]’). A charming Italian Renaissance school-book.

BM STC It., 179; Adams, C 1985; Graesse, II, 185; Renouard, 161:16; Fontanini, I, 233-234.

ITALIAN

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PANVINIO, Onofrio

FROM THE CONTEMPORARY LIBRARY OF THE AUSTRIAN BISHOP OF GURK

Fasti et triumphii Rom[ani].

Venice, Giacomo Strada, 1557.

£4,750

FIRST EDITION. Folio, pp. (18), 228 (i.e. 240), (200). Roman letter, often capitals, much double column and red and black; large allegorical printer’s device on title, a few historiated initials, 262 fine woodcut illustrations of coins, mostly with white-on-black portraits of consuls, generals and emperors; small hole in blank outer margin of title probably due to erasure of old library stamp, light marginal damp stain to first gathering, four browned leaves in the second, clean marginal tear to blank outer upper corner of 2M2. A very fine, well-margined copy in contemporary alum-taw pigskin signed by the German bookbinder M. G., active about 1562 (see Einbanddatenbank, r002340 and r004560), blind-tooled with five elaborate panels, alternating floral decoration with two rolls of neat biblical figures, one with Christ, David, Paul and John the Baptist, the other with Christ, Peter, Paul and John the Baptist surmounted by the four Evangelical symbols; a couple of small stains at front, rear very lightly rubbed; early inked manuscript shelf mark and later label on spine, early title inked on fore-edge in the same hand as the purchase inscriptions ‘Urbanus Ep[iscop]us Gurten[sis] me emit’ on front pastedown and title, dated 1559/ 1561; his large hand-coloured printed armorial bookplate on front pastedown.

Fine copy of the first edition, second and improved issue including privileges printed on χ2 and bound here straight after title, of a landmark in the historiography of ancient Rome. The Augustinian monk Onofrio Panvinio (1529 – 1568) was a giant of the ecclesiastical and antiquarian scholarship of the late Italian Renaissance. An indefatigable writer, he obtained fame with the sequel of Platina’s Life of the Popes and many treatises on Roman history. Amongst them, the Fasti were the most important. This edition, probably supervised by Panvinio himself, shows a highly original and beautiful page layout, resembling the Roman epigraphic design.

Relying on written sources as much as on material evidence drawn from coins and epigraphs, the book describes in a condensed Latin the events that took place from the foundation of Rome to 1555. The narration proceeds according to the succession of Roman kings, consuls, generals, tribunes, high priests, and emperors. It follows the west-east division of the empire from 405 on, recording the Byzantine suzerains on the one hand, the Franck and Germanic Emperors and other European rulers on the other. The book goes on up until the early modern times, thus registering the change in power in the East, with the Muslim sultans taking over from the Byzantine emperors after the fall of Constantinople in 1453.

This copy belonged to Urban Sagstetter (c. 1529 – 1573), Austrian bishop of Gurk from 1556 (as pointed out in his armorial bookplate) and later administrator of the diocese of Vienna. A selective book collector and Hebraist, Sagstetter bought his Fasti at the Diet of Augsburg (‘in comitiis Augustanis’) of 1559. The two detailed purchase notes, evidently inscribed some years after the acquisition by Sagstetter or perhaps his secretary, were first incorrectly dated 1561, when there had been no gathering in Augsburg. Indeed, the same hand corrected the inscription at the foot of the title to read 1559. The confusion may have arisen from the unusually high number of diets held in the mid-sixteenth century in Augsburg and elsewhere in order to tackle (unsuccessfully) the Protestant issue. Still, the incorrect date remains a rather surprising mistake by the owner of Panvinio’s Fasti, a book famous for its accurate chronology.

Not in BM STC It. or Brunet. Adams, P 195 ; Graesse, V, 123; Mortimer, Italian, 355.

L2193

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BACON, Francis

The Essayes, or counsels, civil and moral. To which is added I. The wisdom of the ancients. II. Of the Colours of Good and Evil.

London, A. Millar, 1755.

£125

8vo. pp. (viii) 306, (x), last blank. Roman and italic letter. Title page a bit dusty and browned at edges, light browning and age yellowing, a good, well-margined copy in contemporary calf, re-backed, spine gilt in six compartments.

Not in Gibson.

B65

BACON, Francis

The Essays, Or Councils, Civil and Moral, with a Table of the Colours of Good and Evil. And a Discourse on the Wisdom of the Ancients.

London, E. Holt for Richard Chiswell, 1701.

£175

8vo. pp. (viii) 167, (xviii) 114. Roman and italic letter. Age yellowing, title page upper margin trimmed with no loss of text, rubbed out ex libris, “Banister 1707” to inner margin of free end paper. A few stains, a good copy in modern 1/4 calf, marbled boards.

Gibson 28c.

B63

BACON, Francis

The Essays, Or Councils, Civil and Moral, with a Table of the Colours of Good and Evil. And a Discourse on the Wisdom of the Ancients.

London, J. Newton, 1696.

£250

8vo. Roman and italic letter, black letter on title page. Title page with slight marginal tear, not affecting text, age yellowing and occasional foxing, a well-margined copy. “Isabella Perceval given to her by her Mother Feb. 1805” on fly leaf. In contemporary calf covers, re-backed.

Gibson 27a.

B61

BACON, Francis

Opera Omnia.

Leipzig, Joannis Justi Erythropili, excudebat Christianus Goezius, 1694.

£350

Folio, leaves (ix), numbered columns 1,584, leaves (xxiii). Roman and italic letter, woodcut initials, head- and tail-pieces, light age browning throughout (as usual with this paper), a good, well-margined copy in contemporary calf, panels and spine compartments ruled in blind. One of the few copies without the engraving above imprint.

Gibson 243a.

B60

BACON, Francis

The Essays, Or Councils, Civil and Moral, with a Table of the Colours of Good and Evil. And a Discourse on the Wisdom of the Ancients.

London, A. Swall, 1691.

£250

8vo. pp. (viii) 222, (xiv) 28, (xii) 103, (iii). Roman letter, part titles to second and third works. Light age yellowing, marginal leather soiling to title page, general minor staining and marks. A good, used unrestored copy in contemporary sheep, joints cracked, worn at corners.

Gibson 26d.

B59

BACON, Francis

The Essays, Or Counsels, Civil and Moral, with a Table of the Colours of Good and Evil. Whereunto is added the Wisdom of the Ancients.

London, M. Clark for S. Mearne, 1680.

£950

8vo. (viii) 222, (xiv) 28, (xii) 111, (iii). Roman letter, general title within double line border, separate part titles to second and third works. Old ex dono faded on leaf of first front page, good, clean copy in contemporary calf, re-backed.

Gibson 24a.

B58