FROM THE LIBRARY OF HENRY VIII?

Dominicale fratris Philippi de monte Calerio ordinis minorum

Lyon, sumptibus nobilis viri Balthasaris de gabiano : industria vero et arte probi viri Iacobi myt, 1515.

£27,500

8vo. 352 unnumbered leaves. a8, b4, a-2f8, A-N8, O4Gothic letter, double column. Small white on black floriated initials, bookplate of Robert S. Pirie on pastedown, his note in pencil in upper right corner of first blank “ex coll. Lord Astor”. Light age browning, t-p restored at gutter, upper outer corner of first and final leaves stained and some repaired not affecting text, some edges slightly softened. A handsome copy in a splendid contemporary London binding attributed to Richard Pynson or John Reynes, light-brown calf over wooden boards, covers triple blind ruled to a panel design, upper panel filled with large panel stamp [Oldham, Blind-stamped Panels, HE. 26], the royal arms of Henry VIII, supported by a greyhound and a dragon, sun and moon to upper corners, lower cover with large panel stamp [Oldham, Blind-stamped Panels, RO. 21] Tudor rose above the pomegranate of Catherine of Aragon, surrounded by a scroll held by two angles, with the legend “Hec rosa virtutis de celo missa sereno: Eternu(m) florens regia sceptra ferret,” spine with three large raised bands, blind ruled in compartments, title manuscript on the fore-edge, brass catches, remains of clasps, head and tail of spine expertly repaired, small split at head of upper joint. e.p.s. replaced. Author’s name inked laterally on fore-edge.

Rare Lyon edition of this work in a superb, beautifully preserved contemporary English binding with the panel stamps in fine states of preservation. These two panels, closely associated with Henry VIII, are always found together and are recorded on thirty-six books, those dated ranging from 1502 to 1531. “Hobson has much to say about these panels. From the fact that Reynes’s unsigned roll which is not known on any book after 1520, never appears with them, but that his signed roll, which he did not acquire before that year, does on five examples, he concludes very reasonably that Reynes was not the original owner of these panels, the more so since on eight of the earlier examples 1502-12, rolls not otherwise associated with Reynes, are used with them. Hobson’s conjecture is that the first owner of the panels was Pynson. Clearly, however, the binder of the eleven now known copies of the Assertio with these Panels was Reynes, for four of them bear his signed roll. And it must be presumed, as Hobson argues that these were bound as presentation copies to persons English or foreign, of distinction. At least three, one formerly in the English college at Rome, one in the library of Bologna University, and one in the Royal library at Windsor, bear Henry VIII’s signature.” Oldham p. 36. Bindings with these panels in such a fine state of preservation are extremely rare.

“The Italian lector Filippo di Moncalieri (d. ca. 1344) is yet another important figure in fourteenth-century Franciscan homiletics. He compiled in the early 1330s for his students at the Franciscan study house of Padua two large sermon collections, namely the Postilla super Evangelia Domenicalia and the Postilla super Evangelia que Leguntur in Quadrigesima. Both of these sermon collections had considerable success in the later medieval and the early modern period. Filippo’s sermons were especially sought after by Observant homiletic practitioners, not in the least because his sermons combined complete commentaries on the Gospel readings for the Sundays in question with a strong pastoral interpretation. On top of that, his sermons had a proto-humanistic penchant to them that might have endeared them to the eyes and ears of fifteenth-century religious scholars. Filippo was born at Moncalieri (near Turin), and entered the order in the Genoa province. He ended his life as penitentiary of the S. Pietro basilica in Rome. In the prologues to his successful Postillae, he promised to compose a volume of Sermones et Collationes Morales, yet these do not seem to have survived. … The earliest printed edition of the complete Sunday sermon cycle appeared in 1490” Bert Roest. Franciscan literature of Religious Instruction before the Council of Trent. The next editions were three published at Lyon of which this is the second.

Very rare edition of these sermons a remarkably preserved contemporary English panel binding in remarkable state of preservation.

USTC 155262. Baudrier 7 26. Gültlingen II 122 28. Adams P 1023. Hobson, Blind-stamped Panels, pp. 32-34; Oldham, Blind-stamped Panels, HE. 26 and RO. 21, ill. plates XXI and XLI; I

K89

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