ZONCA, Vittorio

Nouo teatro di machine et edificii per uarie et sicure operationi con le loro figure tagliate in rame e la dichiaratione e dimostratione di ciascuna Opera necessaria ad architetti…

Padua, appresso Pietro Bertell, 1607.

£11,500

FIRST EDITION. Folio. pp. [viii], 88 [iv] 89-115, [i]. *2, a2, A-K4. L6, M-O4, P2. Roman letter. Fine engraved architectural title with putti, arms of the dedicatee above, angelic figure in oval below and forty two full-page engraved plates of machines, woodcut initials, typographical headpieces and ornaments, “Buchan” in a contemporary hand on title. Occasional light marginal spotting, the odd marginal thumb mark. A very good, clean copy, with good dark impressions of the plates in contemporary English vellum over thin boards, green silk ties, a little dust soiled, upper edge of lower cover with small tear.

Rare first edition of Vittorio Zonca’s wonderful, inventive and most influential work, one of the classic books on machinery of the late Italian Renaissance, beautifully illustrated with forty two engraved plates depicting machines for use in paper making, printing, flour mills, silk spinning, and a speculative machine using ‘perpetual motion’, amongst many others. The dedication is by the printer Bertelli to Rainuccio Gambara. Little is known about Zonca (1568-1602) beyond this his major publication which describes him as ‘Architect of the Commune of Padua’; it is evident from this work that he was practically involved with a wide range of disciplines, from hydraulics, to textiles, to printing. Zonca clearly takes his place along with Ramelli, Vrani, and Branca as one of the pre- eminent engineers of late C16 Italy, all of whom share a debt to Leonardo. The work is simply conceived with a detailed plate of each machine, a table of its parts, and a lengthy practical description detailing its function. Nearly all the machines from the “Novo Teatro” focus on water power, though some use humans or animals. Of particular interest are those relating to the manufacture of silk and other fabrics, to the printing press and the manufacture of paper and the operation of canals. He describes the application of the rolling mill to precious and other metals and Zonca appears to be the first engineer to remark that when running against steel any sort of metal other than brass is consumed. He depicts for the first time a set of water driven stampers used in the fabrication of paper pulp, a full description of a printing press with all its parts, and a press for printing engravings, such as in this work. He also describes various ‘filotoio’ or silk weaving machines that were very much ahead of their time. It was not for another hundred years that such machines made their way to England through the auspices of the eighteenth-century industrial spy John Lombe. There are also two interesting machines used for cooking or roasting meat that harness the power of the upward draft of air in the chimney to power a spit. One that stands out is a water pump in which Zonca shows a huge pipe for raising water working as a siphon that would effectively create a machine working in perpetual motion driving a mill-wheel for grinding grain. The idea of a continuous power supply for operating machines was clearly a significant part of Zonca’s research. Some of the engravings, monogramed FV, are by Francis Valesio, others monogramed, Ben W sc, are by Benjamin Wright, some still unidentified have the monogram AH or AHI or AI. The work enjoyed great success, even being translated into Chinese in 1627 by Johannes Schreck to show off the wonderful machines of the west. A very good copy of a beautifully illustrated work, with an intriguing early British provenance. Unfortunately we have not been able to identify the Buchan of the title but the work was undoubtedly bound in Britain, perhaps Scotland, at an early date.

This copy has a slightly different collation to others in that it has an extra two leaves in quire L, though it has the same number of plates.

BM STC C17th. It. p. 979. Riccardi, I 667. Cicognara, 970. Brunet V 1539. Dibner 173. Singer. History of Technology. Vol. III. Kress Lib. S. 366.

L2276

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ANONYMOUS

The Gallery of Modern British Artists

London Simpkin and Marshall, Stationer’s Court, and T.W. Stevens, [et al] 1835

£225

4to. pp. 68 and 76 full-page plates. Not in Lowndes. Probably the earliest printing of these plates. Light foxing to the plate borders and engraved title page, otherwise very good. Fine, contemporary red half-morocco binding, spine gilt, a.e.g. 19th century owner’s bookplate (William Bakewell, Architect) on pastedown.

From the dating in the engravings the book must have been issued in parts between 1834 and 1836. The engraved title page is dated 1836. The engravings, partly on copper, partly on steel, were expressly made from original drawings for this particularly publication. The descriptive text explains the special features of the mostly British locations depicted.

X26

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ROGERS, Samuel

Poems

London printed for T. Cadell [etc] 1834

£750

Crown 8vo pp. 296. FIRST EDITION, proof issue, each engraving signed “proof”. Publisher’s yellow glazed paper boards with leather title piece lettered “Rogers’ Poems. Proofs”. Title page expertly restored and hinges repaired with the same quality and colour of the early 19th century paper, interior immaculate.

Rawlinson 373-405

X58

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PUCKLE, James

The Club; in a Dialogue between Father and Son.

London Printed for the Proprietor, by John Johnson, and Sold by Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orm and Brown 1817

£175

Roy 8vo pp 10(i-x) 96. Fine, modern brown half morocco with gilt lettering and raised bands, marbled endpapers, an elegant volume without foxing. 

James Puckle (1667?-1724) published this collection of “characters” in 1711 which ran to several editions until the mid-Nineteenth century. A microcosmography in the Theophrastian sense with an enormous popularity in England. This de-luxe edition with wooden engravings by John Thompson, Branston, Besbit and other Bewick pupils after the designs by Thurston totalled only 735 copies and was printed by John Johnson, the master-printer and later author of “Typographia” (1824) right after he had left the Lee Priory Press; the style of his Puckle’s Club very much resembles the Lee Priory imprints. This volume also contains the debut as a book illustrator of William Harvey (p.56), who had just left Thomas Bewick, his master, to become the pupil of Haydon, the painter, in London. Chatto & Jackson (p632) are of the opinion that several of the wooden engravings by John Thompson for this volume are “indisputably the best among the very many excellent cuts which have been engraved in England within the last twenty years”.

Lowndes, 2005. 

X73

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YOUNG, Edward.

Night Thoughts on Life, Death and Immortality.

London, Caxton Press by Henry Fisher, 1823.

£120

8vo; 448 p.; illustrated Blue binding in full calf; gold and blind-stamped decorations on sides and back.

Includes other texts of a religious nature, including Blair’s The Grave. With several full-page engravings on copper. A very nice, characteristic binding of the 1830’s.

X72

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KOREAN MAP, Capital Province

JEONG CHEOK MAP OF KOREA’S CAPITAL PROVINCE

Map of the capital province, Joseon Korea.

Korea, first half of 18th century.

£2,750

Hand-drawn map, first half of the 18th century, depicting the capital (gyeonggi 京畿) province of Joseon Korea. It is fourth of the eight provinces of Joseon Korea (Joseon paldo 朝鮮八道, which were reorganised into the 13 modern provinces in 1896.) It states the administrative classification of each district or outpost, as well as how many days of overland travel are required to reach it from the capital. It was intended to aid scholar-officials holding government civil service positions in planning their journeys. This map was produced by an unknown Joseon Korean cartographer in the celebrated and highly distinctive “Jeong Cheok” style, and it is a superb example of this quintessential pre-19th century cartographical tradition.

Mounted within thin oriental wood, framed and glazed, on bamboo paper, measuring 45cm x 39.3cm, including fabric border of 6.1-6.7cm. The map itself is 32.2cm x 27.1cm. Text border on all sides, however all but the outer border have been cropped. The border that remains is 0.9-1.2cm deep, with a slither remaining along the top. The paper has occasional faint darker areas, however none diminish the legibility or artistry. The map was folded into twelve parts, leaving two horizontal and three vertical creases, with very slight wear, including a small hole in the lower centre of the map at the intersection of two creases. Small tear in the far lower left, however the area affected is only ocean. There is also a small black smudge in the ocean just off the tip of the north-western peninsula.

The map has been produced in the style of Jeong Cheok (정척/鄭陟, 1390– 1475), a successful 15th century cartographer, himself a scholar-retainer who served several Joseon kings. The modern concepts of latitude and longitude were not understood in Korea until the early 19th century, and the flatness and distortion of the land in Jeong Cheok-style representations reflect this. Nonetheless, the shape, layout, and topographical properties of the provinces are depicted with impressive accuracy, enabling an overland traveller to plan the most direct route avoiding natural barriers. “Jeong Cheok” maps bear a number of distinct stylistic characteristics. First, further information is added in a text border surrounding the map. Second, natural topographical features are highly simplified; mountains are indicated symbolically as a jagged row of uniform peaks, and coasts and waterways are low-detail. Third, districts – always with two-syllable names – and military bases are represented by uniformly sized bubbles. In this map, these bubbles are pink; the district name is written down the centre of the bubble; to the right is the number of days of overland travel required to reach it from the capital, and to the left is its administrative classification. The capital city (gyeong ) bubble is circled twice. The Joseon administrative classification system includes, from largest to smallest, the bu (provincial capital city), mok (mid-level city), gun or su (county or prefecture), and finally lyeong or gam (small town).

The lines and text of the map are drawn in black ink. Land is uncoloured, while water is depicted in a light blue wash. Strikingly, water is coloured darker blue where it meets land. Mountains are coloured brown and labelled. Islands, also named, are depicted as white ovals in the ocean. Land-based outposts (yeogdo 驛道) and offshore ocean settlements are marked in white boxes. There is a title box with “Capital – [province] four” (gyeonggi sa 京畿四) in the top right corner. Within the text border running along the top, left, and right sides, there are remarks about what lies beyond the map in these directions.

L1755

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KOREAN MAP, Jeolla Province

JEONG CHEOK MAP OF KOREAN PROVINCEL1755 Korean Map 1

Map of Jeolla province, Joseon Korea.

Korea, first half of 18th century.

£2,250

Hand-drawn map, first half of the 18th century, depicting Jeolla 全羅, sixth of the eight provinces of Joseon Korea (Joseon paldo 朝鮮八道, which were reorganised into the 13 modern provinces in 1896.) It states the administrative classification of each district or outpost, as well as how many days of overland travel are required to reach it from the capital. It was intended to aid scholar-officials holding government civil service positions in planning their journeys. This map was produced by an unknown Joseon Korean cartographer in the celebrated and highly distinctive “Jeong Cheok” style, and is a superb example of this quintessential pre-19th century cartographical tradition.

Mounted within thin oriental wood, framed and glazed, the map, on bamboo paper, is set within a fabric border 5.9cm deep, measuring 45cm x 39.3cm. The map itself is 33cm x 27.3cm. Text border on all sides, however the lower border has been cropped. The borders that remain are 1.4cm deep. The paper has occasional faint darker areas, however none diminish the legibility or artistry. The map was folded into twelve parts, leaving two horizontal and three vertical creases, with very slight wear. Small hole in the lower centre of the map at the intersection of two creases; tear at lower edge (6.5cm x 3cm at its worst) affecting the depiction of the southernmost peninsula.

The map has been produced in the style of Jeong Cheok (정척/鄭陟, 1390 – 1475), a successful 15th century cartographer, himself a scholar-retainer who served several Joseon kings. The modern concepts of latitude and longitude were not understood in Korea until the early 19th century, and the flatness and distortion of the land in Jeong Cheok-style representations reflect this. Nonetheless, the shape, layout, and topographical properties of the provinces are depicted with impressive accuracy, enabling an overland traveller to plan the most direct route avoiding natural barriers.

“Jeong Cheok” maps bear a number of distinct stylistic characteristics. First, further information is added in a text border surrounding the map. Second, natural topographical features are highly simplified; mountains are indicated symbolically as a jagged row of uniform peaks, and coasts and waterways are low-detail. Third, districts (always with two-syllable names) and military bases are represented by uniformly sized bubbles. In this map, these bubbles are pink; the district name is written down the centre of the bubble; to the right is the number of days of overland travel required to reach it from the capital, and to the left is its administrative classification. The Joseon administrative classification system includes, from largest to smallest, the bu (provincial capital city), mok (mid-level city), gun or su (county or prefecture), and finally lyeong or gam (small town).

The lines and text of the map are drawn in black ink. Land is uncoloured, while water is depicted in a light blue wash. Strikingly, water is coloured darker blue where it meets land. Mountains are coloured brown and labelled. Islands, also named, are depicted as white ovals in the ocean. There are one military base (byeongyeong 兵營) and two naval bases (suyeong 水營), left and right, in pink bubbles. Land-based outposts (yeogdo 驛道) and offshore ocean settlements are marked in white boxes. There is a title box with “Jeolla province – six” (Jeolla do lyuk 全羅道六) in the top right corner. Within the text border running along the top, left, and right sides, there are remarks about what lies beyond the map in these directions.

L1754

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MILLER, Thomas

Turner and Girtin’s Picturesque Views, Sixty Years Since.

London, J. Hogarth, 1854.

£200

Imperial 8vo. (lx) 164 + 30 engravings on copper. Publisher’s red, half-morocco with gilt back, minimal browning to plate edges, boards slightly discoloured in places. A nice copy.

The first re-printing (third state) of Turner and Thomas Girtin’s thirty contributions to the “Copper-Plate Magazine” (1794-98), the second states of which appeared in the “Itinerant” (1798). Thomas Miller in his preface describes the recovery of the original plates and the efforts required to clean and prepare the plates for this 1854 edition. In 1873, a second re-print was undertaken (fourth state; Rawnlinson, Reprint B), but the results were poor. The volume includes important, early biographies of both artists. The full page views are the earliest engravings after Turner and Girtin. The book is “worth having” (Muir, p.81).

Rawlinson, vol I 1-15a, reprint A.

X66

BUTLER, Samuel

Hudibras, in Three Parts, Written in the Time of the Late War: Corrected and Amended. With Large Annotations, and a preface, by Zachary Grey, LL.D.. Adorned with a new Set of Cuts. Vol. I (II).

Cambridge, J. Bentham, Printer of the University, for W. Innys, 1744.

£200

8vo. Two volumes. Volume I: (xxxvi) + list of subscribers + pp. 440. Volume II: pp. 446 + (24). Frontispiece portrait of the author, engraved by George Vertue. In full modern calf antique. Fine copy.

Contains William Hogarth’s “Small Hudibras Series,” 17 illustrations re-engraved for this edition by J. Mynde (Ronald Paulson: Hogarth’s Graphic Works, 1965. Vol. 1, p. 125).

“Copies in fine condition are in considerable reques” (Lowndes). “Grey’s has formed the basis of all subsequent editions.” (Enc.Brit. 11th Ed.)

Lowndes: 335. Brunet: 15803.

X68

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LUTTRELL, Narcissus. Seal.

Desk Seal.

£4,950

Elegant bone and silver-mounted desk seal, c. 1682, the handle in the form of a sphere unscrewing at its equator with a compartment for wafers, the intaglio quartz matrix (1 cm) with the arms of Narcissus Luttrell and his wife Sarah, dexter: Luttrell and Mapowder (his mother, heiress with her sister of the Mapowder estate) and, sinister: Baker for his wife Sarah, 7 cm long, small chip to matrix edge.

A rare 17th century example of a fine desk seal with an important book collecting association. Narcissus Luttrell (1657 – 1732) was a member of Parliament, annalist and book collector, whose chronicles of contemporary events and parliamentary diary are particularly valuable. His very extensive library of books and manuscripts, especially political and poetical works, was dispersed piecemeal by Luttrell’s descendants and many items are no longer traceable. A substantial number of the printed works were eventually acquired by the British Library, and a large number of manuscripts found their way to the Codrington Library in 1786, while more recently many items were donated to the Beinecke Library of Yale University. Luttrell married Sarah, daughter of Daniel Baker (a prosperous London merchant), in February 1682 and this seal is likely to have been made close after that date. Luttrell’s silver penner with the same arms on the top is held by the Victoria & Albert Museum (Ref. M. 298 – 1975).

L1758