GALLE, Theodore; ORSINI, Fulvio; FABER, Johannes

Illustrium imagines ex antiquis marmoribus, nomismatibus, et gemmis expressae, quae exstant Romae, maior pars apud Fulvium Ursinum

Antwerp, ex officina Plantiniana, 1606.

£3,250

FIRST EDITION thus. 4to. 2 parts in 1 vol.; 1) pp. 8 [iv], 151 engraved plates, pp. [iv], 17 engraved plates lettered A-R. 2) pp. (viii) 88 (vi). Five additional plates from another work. Roman and Italic letter. Finely engraved title-page with figures of ‘Cornucopiae’ on one side ‘Felix antiquitatas’ on the other, intricate early monogram finely stamped below, full-page engraved portrait of the author, 151+17 engraved plates, Plantin’s engraved printer’s device on second title-page, his woodcut printer’s device on final verso, with 5 additional similar engravings at end, ‘Joseph Lauthier’ inscribed at foot of first title-page, armorial bookplate of Oliver Pemberton on pastedown, Patricia A. Milne-Henderson’s booklabel above, armorial bookplate of Henry J.B. Clements of Killadoon, Ireland, on rear pastedown. Light age yellowing, t-p fractionally dusty, the occasional mark or spot. A very good, well margined copy in good contemporary French red morocco gilt, covers bordered with a double gilt rule, gilt central oval formed of leafy sprays, spine gilt ruled in compartments, gilt fleurons at centres, later black morocco labels gilt, extremities and joints a little worn, spine a little rubbed.

First edition of this important collection of portraits from antiquity with the commentary of Johannes Faber and with an additional 17 plates. Fulvio Orsini of Rome, 1529 – 1600 was a renowned antiquarian, collector of books and antiquities, particularly gems and portraits. Orsini published a number of his own ancient portraits, with commentary in his ‘Imagines et elogia virorum illustrium at eruditorum’ (Rome 1570). “Most of our knowledge about Orsini’s collection comes from the work of Dirk Galle (Gallaeus) who visited Rome in 1595 and made drawings of 240 portraits from Roman collections, especially that of Orsini. Galle engraved 151 of these for his own illustrium imagines (published by Plantin, Antwerp 1598), but Orsini was dissatisfied with the publication because it lacked a scholarly commentary. Orsini prepared notes for such a commentary but was unable to complete the work before he died, and the notes were taken over by Johanes Faber, a German physician and botanist to the Pope, who finally issued the commentary for the second edition of the work (Antwerp 1606). This book enlarged with seventeen additional reproductions, became the basic reference work on portrait iconography for two centuries… for this kind of work he (Orsini) is o en characterised today as the ‘father of ancient iconography.’ One of his most influential identifications however was later rejected. He was the first to identify the portrait of Seneca, from a bust in the Farnese collection; later he was proved wrong with the discovery of an inscribed portrait bust of Seneca in 1813.” Nancy Thomson de Grummond. ‘Encyclopedia of the History of Classical Archaeology.’

This work is extra illustrated with five further plates in the same style, unsigned but also probably by Galle and drawn from the Orsisni collection, with the manuscript title, Appendicula Nondam edita. They include a portrait of Pompeius Magnus, broken busts of Aristoteles, Euripides, and inscriptions concerning Menander and Homer.

The Joseph Lauthier autograph on the title is probably that of the Author of the work “Nouvelles Regles Pour Le Jeu De Mail,” published by C. Huguier & A. Cailleau, 1717 and translated into English the same year as ‘New rules for the game of Mail’. The Game of Mail or Pall Mall is one of the precursors of the game of Golf.

BM STC Low Countries 1601-1620 p. 218, G8.

L2366

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BIBLE

IN A TAPESTRY WORK BINDING AND THE ONLY COPY

BIBLE. The New Testament of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, newly translated out of the original Greek: and with the former translations diligently compared and revised by His Majesties speciall command.

Edinburgh, printed by Robert Bryson, and are to be sold at his shop …, 1641

[with]

PSALMS. The Whole Booke of Psalmes. Collected Into English meter by Tho. Sternhold, Jo. Hopkins, W. Whittingham and others, conferred with the Hebrew.

London, imprinted by I. L. for the Company of Stationers., 1643.

£8,500

24mo. Two vols. in one. 1) 264 unnumbered leaves, A-Y12. 2) pp. 282 [vi]. A-M12. Roman letter. First title with typographical border within line border, second title with typographical border, woodcut initials and other woodcut and typographical ornaments in both vols. Early woodcut bookplate of Edwards or Edwardes, baronets, of Shrewsbury on pastedown, “Mary Edwards, 1759” ms. below, autograph Margarett Haynes on front fly. Light age yellowing, X6 with tiny tear with slight loss to a few letters, a few creases in places, the rare marginal spot or mark. Very good copies, crisp and clean, in a charming contemporary tapestry-work embroidered binding on fine canvas, covers and turn ins with a sliver thread border, all over designs of two large flowers, with birds and insects interspersed, on covers, spines with embroidered bands with small flowers in compartments, all edges gilt. Extremities a little worn, upper joint with small crack, small losses to the silver thread border.

Exceptionally rare; most probably the unique surviving copy of the second work, which is not recorded in ESTC, and the only complete surviving copy of the first, in a fine contemporary embroidered binding worked in colours with tapestry-stitch. It is in itself a rare example of a near miniature tapestry work binding.“English books bound in embroidered canvas range over a period of about two hundred and fifty years, the earliest known specimen dating from the fourteenth century, and instances of the work occurring with some frequency from this time until the middle of the seventeenth century. The majority of these bindings are worked in tapestry-stitch, or tent-stitch, in designs illustrating Scriptural subjects in differently coloured threads.” Davenport. English Embroidered Bookbindings.

This copy has been finely worked with minute stitching, with flowers on both covers in blues, greens, yellows, browns and reds, the delicate stitching creating subtle grades of colour. The spine has been worked in bands with small embroidered flowers in imitation of an normal binding. It is possible that the binding was made in Scotland, though the later provenance is English.

“In the sixteenth century embroidered work was very popular with the Tudor princesses, gold and silver thread and pearls being largely used, often with very decorative effect. The simplest of these covers are also the best—but great elaboration was often employed …..Under the Stuarts the lighter feather-stitch was preferred, and there seems to have been a regular trade in embroidered Bibles and Prayer-books of small size, sometimes with floral patterns, sometimes with portraits of the King, or Scriptural scenes.” Davenport.

Davenport also notes that ladies often made embroidered gloves to match the binding “in hands thus gloved these little bindings, always pretty, often really artistic, must have looked exactly right, while their vivid colours must have been admirably in harmony with the gay Cavalier dresses.” Embroidery or needlework had been employed on ms. service books in medieval times but almost no English examples survive. The majority of surviving examples, and the only ones appearing on the market, date from the first half of the C17 when they again became fashionable on small service books or works of piety, particularly among ladies of rank. Few have endured in anything like their original condition. Fragile at best, many have become dilapidated through usage and later neglect, some were defaced or completely destroyed by disapproving Puritans during the Civil War, whilst the richest were invariably looted for their gold and silver threads. Where as here, they have  survived virtually intact, few artefacts are more redolent of the feminine culture and society of Stuart England.

The only institutional copy recorded of this edition of the New Testament is in the National Library of Scotland (imperfect). For the second work ESTC records a 32mo edition of the Psalms by the same printer in 1643 (Wing B2394) but no copy of this 24mo. edition.

  1. ESTC R172929 One copy only at National Library of Scotland (incomplete lacking three leaves). Wing B2645A.
  2. Unrecorded.

L2264

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FITZRALPH, Richard

Ricardi Archiepiscopi Armachani Hyberniae Primatis Defensorum Curatorum aduersus eos qui privilegiatos se dicunt –

Paris, Apud Petrum Billaine, 1633.

8vo. pp. [xvi] 168. á8, A-K8, L4. (á7+8 blank). Roman letter, some Italic. Small woodcut ornament on title, floriated woodcut initials and woodcut headpieces. Light age yellowing, the very occasional marginal spot or mark. A very good copy in modern three-quarter calf over marbled boards, spine with raised bands, blind ruled in compartments, blind fleurons.

Extremely rare edition of the major published work of the C14th Archbishop of Armagh, Richard Fitzralph, the first printed book by an Irish author, a work which defended the secular clergy in their contest with the mendicant orders; this edition was most probably printed at Paris at the instigation of the secular priest Paul Harris who was himself involved in a similar dispute at Dublin over three centuries later. Richard FitzRalph, Archbishop of Armagh, one of the most eminent Irish churchmen of the middle ages, was born at Dundalk about the end of the 13th century, and was educated at Oxford where he became Chancellor in 1333. He was made Chancellor of the church of Lincoln in 1334, became Archdeacon of Chester in 1336, and was installed Dean of Lichfield in 1337. He was advanced to the see of Armagh By Pope Clement VI. and was consecrated at Exeter, on 8th July 1347.“Fitzralph’s controversy with the friars came to a crisis when he was cited to Avignon in 1357. Avowing his entire submission to the authority of the Holy See, he defended his attitude towards the friars in the plea entitled “Defensorium Curatorum”. He maintained as probable that voluntary mendicancy is contrary to the teachings of Christ. His main plea, however, was for the withdrawal of the privileges of the friars in regard to confessions, preaching, burying, etc. He urged a return to the purity of their original institution, claiming that these privileges undermined the authority of the parochial clergy. The friars were not molested, but by gradual legislation harmony was restored between them and the parish clergy. Fitzralph’s position, however, was not directly condemned, and he died in peace at Avignon.” Catholic Encyclopaedia.

This edition contains an additional foreword under the title, ‘Ad Lectorem prfatio apologetic’ which has been attributed to the secular Priest Paul Haris then involved in a violent dispute with Thomas Fleming, Franciscan archbishop of Dublin. Paul Harris was not the only Secular Priest to oppose the Friars and it is certain that the secular priests looked to FitzRalph’s work for inspiration. “David Rothe, Bishop of Ossory, and first member of the new counter-reformation episcopate being established in Ireland from 1618, was alleged to hold the view that members of religious orders had forfeited their rights to the old monastic impropriations and even speculated that members of religious orders were not, in the strict sense members of the ecclesiastical hierarchy. Rothe’s regular opponents even dubbed him ‘un Segundo Richardo Armachano’ after Richard FitzRalph the anti-mendicant fourteenth-century archbishop.” John McCafferty. ‘The Reconstruction of the Church of Ireland’. A very good copy of a very rare work.

Not in BM STC Fr. C16th. Shaaber F118. Three locations only, none in the US.

£2500

L2066

He espoused the cause of the secular clergy in their contests with the mendicant orders, whose abuses he discerned and exposed both by writings and preaching. The heads of the Irish Franciscans and Dominicans cited him to Avignon, where he appeared, and in presence of Pope Innocent VI. undauntedly maintained the conclusions he had arrived at. The examination of the matter was committed to the cardinals, who, after a long controversy, decided against him. FitzRalph was silenced, and the rights of the friars in relation to preaching, confession, and free sepulchre were maintained. FitzRalph died at Avignon, 16th November 1360. Ten years afterwards, in 1370, his bones are said to have been translated to Dundalk, by Stephen de Valle, Bishop of Meath.

By tradition this was the first printing of a book by an author of whose Irish birth there is no doubt and the only two copies of the 1st edition are to be found in the British Library and the Bibliothque Nationale in Paris. The former consists of 34 leaves, 30 lines to the page, without a titlepage, pagination or catch-words. The earliest usage of a titlepage is in the Paris edition, c.1485. Fitzralph, also called Radulphus in the Latin version, was born in Dundalk and was archbishop of Armagh from 1347 until his death in 1360. His Oxford tutor, John Bakenthorp, had been a great antagonist of the friars and Fitzralph took the same position, eventually being summoned to Avignon in 1357 to defend himself before Pope Innocent VI. This edition is attributed to Paul Harris, then involved in a violent disputation with Thomas Fleming, Franciscan archbishop of Dublin. With an additional foreword under the title, Ad Lectorem prfatio apologetic. In the expert opinion of Fr Ignatius Fennessy OFM gives credence to the Harris connection. Sweeney 1931 quoting 1st edition of 1475?.

á8, A-K8, L4. (á7+8 blank).

BARNES, John

Traicté et dispute contre les équivoques, traduit du latin de R. P. F.

Paris, R. Baragnes et J. Villery, 1625

£1,250

FIRST EDITION. 8vo. pp. (xl) 571 (iii) first and last blank. Roman and Italic letter. Small woodcut printer’s device on title, historiated woodcut initials, typographical and woodcut headpieces, small library stamp of the Jesuit college at Rouen in blank margin of title page, their later label on verso. General light browning. A good clean copy in contemporary limp vellum, remains of ties.

First edition in French of this interesting argument against the Jesuit doctrine of equivocation or mental reservation, published simultaneously with a Latin version. “Such orthodox English protestants as Thomas Morton or Henry Mason held religious views which were profoundly different from those of John Barnes, a Benedictine monk exiled in France. Yet all three adopted broadly the same position on equivocation. In essence, their case consisted of two propositions. Firstly mental reservation was lying, and lying was wrong. Secondly, it was a devious, hypocritical, and Machiavellian doctrine. … (Barnes) held that the Devil was the author of mental reservation, and asserted that all the arguments which had been cited in support of the practise worked equally well in favour of lying; indeed lying was preferable, for it had ancient precedent and was an activity recognised by canon law. Barnes had little time for liars. ‘You should not lie’ he said ‘even to save your life’. … Barnes claimed that the Jesuitical doctrine was Machiavellian. Like the florentine, proponents of Mental reservation allowed evil to be done in order that good might result. .. Barnes’ book was approved by the Sorbonne. In France, popular misgivings about mental reservation were ruthlessly exploited by Gallican opponents of the Jesuits.” Edmund Leites ‘Conscience and Casuistry in Early Modern Europe.’

“John Barnes was one of those Roman Catholics, who, following the Examples of Erasmus Cassander Wicelius, Father Paul and many others, made all their lifetime profession of the Catholic religion, though they observed a great many abuses in it, which they heartily wished to see reformed. He wrote a book against Mental reservations (Traicté et dispute contre les équivoques), which was not at all pleasing to the Jesuits, though he dedicated it to Pope Urban VIII. … Doubtless he desired to bring the two Churches as near one another as ever he could.” ‘The dictionary historical and critical of Mr. Peter Bayle,’ Barnes’ writings earned him many ennemies, especially amongst the Jesuits and his own order of the Benedictines.

“Wood relates that his writings ‘made him so much hated by those of his order that endeavours were made to seize upon him and make him an example.’ Barnes, perceiving the danger, fled to Paris, and there placed himself under the protection of the Spanish ambassador. In consequence, however, of the efforts made by Father Clement Reyner and his interest with Albert of Austria, Barnes was carried from Paris by force. … According to Wood he was conveyed from Flanders to Rome, where, by command of the pope, he was, as a contriver of new doctrine, thrust into a dungeon of the Inquisition. His mind giving way, he was removed to a lunatic asylum behind the church of St. Paul the Less, and he appears to have been confined there until his death, which occurred in August 1661.” DNB. A very good copy of this rare work, most interestingly from a Jesuit library, the Jesuit College at Rouen.

Shaaber. B 229. Not in BM STC fr. C16th, Brunet or Graesse.

L1936

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PSALTER

Psalterium in quatuor linguis Hebraea, Graeca, Chaldaea, Latina.

Cologne, [Johann Soter for Johann Potken], 1518.

£6,950

Small fol., 144 leaves, a-y6, ç6, &6. Roman, Hebrew, Greek and Ethiopic letters; title within elaborate border with interlacing floral decoration; occasional dust-soiling and marginal foxing, couple of tiny wormholes at foot and, in the first gathering, also to outer margin, old marginal repair to first five leaves, light dampstain at foot of final gathering. A good copy in late seventeenth-century English calf with gilt border; rebacked and restored, a little scuffed; on title, shelfmark and ink stamp of the Royal Society ‘ex dono’ of Henry Howard (1628-1684).

The second book to be printed in liturgical Ethiopic (Ge’ez) and the first polyglot psalter including that language. The editor, Johann Potken (c.1470-c.1525), was also responsible for the previous and earliest appearance of Ge’ez in print with his Alphabetum seu potius Syllabarium chaldaearum, published in Rome with Marcellus Silber in 1513. A Hebraist and clergyman from Cologne, Potken was at the time in the Papal city to serve Leo X. There, he got in touch with the Ethiopic community flourishing around the Church of St Peter of the Abyssinians, learnt Ge’ez from the pilgrim monk Thomas Walda Samuel and cut (or commissioned) an Ethiopic type for Silber, which he later brought back to Cologne and used for this Psalter. Curiously, Potken, the pioneer of Ethiopic printing, incorrectly called this language ‘Chaldea’, an ambiguous term which was commonly used in relation to Aramaic. An earlier polyglot Psalter featuring Arabic and Aramaic in addition to the Hebrew, Greek and Latin text was edited and published by Agostino Giustiniani in Genoa in 1516.

This copy was presented by Henry Howard, 6th Duke of Norfolk, to the Royal Society. The gift probably took taken place in 1667 along with donation of large part of the Arundel-Howard family library, including the beautiful manuscript copy of Geoffrey of Monmouth’s Historia regum Britanniae, later acquired by the British Museum and now BL, MS Arundel 10.

BM STC Ger., 95; Adams, B1371; Brunet, IV, 920; Graesse, V, 469; Darlow & Moule, 1413; Fumagalli, 1243.

L1174a

LATIN, GREEK, HEBREW AND GE’EZ

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LUTHER, Martin

Jena, Donat Richtzenhan et Thomas Rebart (vols 1, 3) and Christian Rödinger & heirs (vols 2, 4), 1557-1579.

£3,750

In 4 vols. Folio: 1): ff. [12], 540, [4]; 2): ff. [6], 603, [1]; 3) ff. [4], 540, [2]; 4): ff. [4], 822, [2]. Predominantly Roman letter, little Italic and Greek; large historiated initials, titles within elaborate border with the symbols of the Evangelists, Christ on the cross with John Frederick I, Elector of Saxony and Luther kneeling, background landscape and castle and their coats of arms; in vols 2-4, full-page portratis of the dedicatees, the Protestant Saxon princes and brothers Johann Frederick II, Johann Wilhelm and Johann Frederick III, continuous chronological diagram on many leaves of vol. 4; lightly age browned, small dampstains occasionally to blank margins, a few leaves lightly foxed. A fine set in contemporary German alum-tawed bevelled pigskin, elaborately blind-tooled with various rolls of palms, Biblical figures and scenes, personifications of virtues, medallion portraits of Roman emperors, floral decoration, central plate with Jael killing Sisera in vol. 1 (Einbanddatenbank, p003434); remains of the eight original clasps, three functioning; minor rubbing and a few small stains; title and shelfmark inked on spine by contemporary and later hands; late seventeenth-century ex libris of Johann Theodor Eckhart ‘Volkholfheimensis p.’ on front pastedown of vol. 1; armorial bookplate of Johann Georg Sigward (1554-1618) on front pastedown of 2 and, dated 1607, on title verso of 3, along with his portrait by Lukas Kilian, dated 1614, on front pastedown; inscription of the Benedictine Abbey of Saint-Pierre de Senones dated 174[0] on titles of 1, 3 and 4 and related shelfmark on verso of front endpaper of all four vols; contemporary German marginalia in De servo arbitrio in vol. 3 and by later hand in commentary on Psalm 127 in 4.

A finely bound complete set of the Latin works by the initiator of the Reformation. With his prolific activity as a religious writer and polemicist, Luther (1483-1546) was one of the fathers of modern German language, but his extensive output in Latin was equally important and influential. This mixed set is formed by the two contemporary Jena editions, published from 1557 onwards. The first comprehensive collection was made in Wittenberg with Melanchthon’ and other Reformed scholars’ contributions and the sponsorship of the Elector of Saxony; yet, the Jean imprints, particularly those of Rödinger and heirs, are considered of better philological quality (Graesse, IV, 300).

The set has an interesting provenance. It first belonged to Johann Georg Sigward (1554-1618), prominent Evangelic theologian and professor in Tubingen, who penned several Latin religious treatises elucidating Lutheran articles of faith, including predestination. Later, it went into the hands of Johann Theodor Eckhart, apparently a pastor in Hofheim, in the area of Frankfurt. In 1740, it was catalogued in the vast Benedictine library of Saint-Pierre de Senones, which was being enlarged by the erudite abbot and Biblical exegete Antoine Augustin Calmet (1672-1757). It may have served for his studies, which won him the esteem of many Protestant theologians and, despite later attacks, of Voltaire, who was a guest in the Senones monastery in the early 1750s.

Not in BM STC Ger. Adams, L1738 (vol. 1), L1747 (vol. 3); Brunet, III, 1240; Graesse, IV, 300 (vols 2 and 4); VD16 ZV 10105, L3424, L3435, L3427.

L2042

LATIN

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VITRUVIUS POLLIO, Marcus

De architectura libri decem … adiecimus etiam … Frontini de aequeductibus … item … Nicolai Cusani Card. de staticis experimentis.

Strasbourg, Georg Messerschmidt for Knobloch, 1543.

£3,250

4to, pp. [52], 262 [i.e. 260], [52]. Italic letter, little Greek; historiated initials, numerous illustrations, mainly architectural, some full-page; light marginal dampstain in first and final gatherings, tiny clean tear to margin of first four leaves and p. 29. A very good copy in c1600 English calf with blind ruled border and gilt lined edges; title label on spine, all edges red; extremities and spine slightly rubbed; c1900 armorial bookplate of Hopetoun House and ex libris slip of Bernard E. J. Pagel (1930-2007), FRS and astrophysicist, on front pastedown; two owner’s inscriptions on front fly, one 19 September 1636 largely scribbled over, the other mid-seventeenth century by ‘Guliellmum Lythall’, with ‘pretium 68’.

First German edition of the masterpiece of ancient architecture, designed to be easily handled by an architect or scholar rather than as a huge glamourous book. Vitruvius (80-70 BC, after 15 BC ) was an architect and military engineer. While very little is known about him, his Ten Books on Architecture, dedicated to Augustus, very early acquired universal fame. The text of this edition is carefully revised by the Alsatian humanist, physician and mathematician Walther Hermann Ryff (c.1500-1548), while the illustrations are generally based on the 1521 Como edition in Italian, showing a great deal of buildings, cities, ornaments as well as civil and military machineries, such as cranes, mills, catapults and battering rams. One can also find two woodcuts depicting the perfect symmetry and proportion of human male body through the famous Vitruvian Man, which was illustrated, i.a., by Leonardo. The edition ends with the work of Frontinus (c.40-103 AD) on the aqueducts of ancient Rome and Nicholas of Cusa’s treatise on statics (1450). The latter provides methods for measuring through the use of scales and water clock; for instance, it explains in detail how to determine the humidity of air by measuring the weight of wool.

This copy reached in England by 1636 and some years later was acquired by William Lythall, likely the Beadle of the Society of the Apothecaries of London, died ca. 1657. Afterwards, it entered the famous Hopetoun library, sold in 1889 by the 7th Earl of Hopetoun (see De Ricci, English Collectors, p. 164).

BM STC Ger., 958; Adams, V 906; Berlin Kat., 1806; Cicognara, 707; Fowler, 401.

L2191

LATIN

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BIBLIA

Biblia utriusque Testamenti.

[Geneva], Robert Estienne, 1556-1557.

£65,000

In 2 vols. Fol., ff. [10], 188, 316, [2], 436, 336, 41, [1]. Predominantly Roman letter, some Greek and Hebrew; large printer’s device and decorative head-piece with vine and peasants on title and half-title, a few detailed illustrations, one full-page; title slightly dust-soiled with torn outer lower corner, a few leaves age yellowed, occasional light foxing mainly to margins, small marginal waterstain to final gatherings of vol. 2. A stunning, well-margined copy in exceptional morocco by the King’s binder of Geneva (cf. M. M. Foot, The Henry Davis Gift, pp. 279-285, nos 226-229), elegantly tooled with gilt and painted black border with panel of interlacing ribbons, painted black, and gouges, unpainted, on background powdered with dots, one mask at head and one at foot, some elements carved after gilding; spine similarly tooled, all board edges gilt with horizontal, vertical and diagonal lines, all edges gauffered with gilt floral and grotesque motifs; joints possibly strengthened, a little rubbed at corners; eighteenth-century English annotation on front pastedown of vol. 1, quoting from the 1732 English translation of Calmet’s Dictionnaire historique, critique, chronologique, géographique et littéral de la Bible; c19 stamp of ‘G. W. Oxenham’ on front pastedown of both vols, Magg’s acquisition labels (March 1940) on rear pastedown of vol. 2.

Splendidly bound copy of the fifth edition of the renowned Latin Bible of Robert Estienne (1503-1559). It was the first to include Theodor Beza’s translation and commentaries on the New Testament, following Estienne’s conversion to Calvinism and subsequent move to Geneva. The book retains the detailed woodcut illustrations of the 1540 edition and the Latin version of the Old Testament by Sante Pagnini. Although this was not exactly the first attempt to separate and number biblical verses, the vast influence of the edition made this practice accepted once and for all.

The extraordinarily rich and detailed binding on both volumes can be attributed with certainty to the King’s binder, who was arguably the best in Geneva in the second half of the sixteenth century and probably a Parisian craftsman who emigrated due to unorthodox religious belief (I. Schunke, ‘Die Genfer Einbände in U. Fuggers Bibliothek’, in Die Einbände der Palatina, I, Vatican, 1962, pp. 218-236 and M. M. Foot, ‘The Geneva King’s binder and other 16th-century bindings decorated with masks’, Association International de Bibiliophilie: XXIVe Congrès 2005, pp. 17-29). His elaborate style, influenced by Parisian models, is characterised by lavish gauffering and use of grotesque and bizarre masks (here a sad-looking king and a staring ram) as decorative elements at head and foot of covers, from which the rest of the interlacing decoration usually springs.

BM STC Fr., Supplement, 11; Adams, B 1055 ; Darlow & Moule, 614; Renouard, 87 (‘depuis long-temp fort rare’); Schreiber, 113; Brunet, I, 876; Graesse, I, 394.

K94

LATIN (WITH SOME GREEK AND HEBREW)

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CICERO, Marcus Tullius

Epistole famigliari.

Venice, Paolo Manuzio, 1554-1555.

£1,750

8vo, ff. 319, [1]. Italic letter; large printer’s device on title and, within floral border with putti, on last; occasionally lightly age yellowed, light damp stain to lower gutter of a few central gatherings. A very good copy in contemporary rustic limp vellum, contemporary title inked on spine; pasted stubs from fourteenth-century ms, remains of ties; slightly worn; contemporary ex libris of ‘Pompeo del Capellan’ at foot of final verso and couple of marginalia in his hand; inscriptions, drawings and scribbles, partly faint, by other contemporary hands on front and rear endpapers and flys and formerly on covers.

An interesting copy of the earliest influential Italian translation of a masterpiece of Latin literature, first published by the Aldine press in 1545. The translator, Guido Logli from Reggio, was a man of letters in service of the Farnese family and acted as agent of Paolo Manuzio in contracting the publication of some works of Annibal Caro and Girolamo Ruscelli. This edition is part of the ambitious plan pursued by Paolo Manuzio to provide his readership with the complete works of Cicero not only in Latin, but also the Italian vernacular.

The vast corpus of Ciceronian Epistolae and Orationes was for a long time used as foundation texts in early modern schools. Indeed, this copy bears an inscription of the otherwise unknown ‘Pompeo de’ Capellan’, written in a childish hand and employing Venetian dialect (‘Questo libro siè de mi’). The other inscriptions, scribbles and drawings – some only visible under UV lamp – by Pompeo or slightly later students comprise try-outs of Latin alphabet, a passage from the prayer to Virgin Mary (‘sancta Maria ora pro nobis’) and a formal address for a letter in Italian vernacular (‘Al Mag.co sig.or Manoli amico et come patron mio sempre osser[vantissimo]’). A charming Italian Renaissance school-book.

BM STC It., 179; Adams, C 1985; Graesse, II, 185; Renouard, 161:16; Fontanini, I, 233-234.

ITALIAN

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JESUIT RELATIONS

Nuovi avisi dell’Indie di Portogallo … terza parte.

Venice, Michele Tramezzino, 1562.

£3,750

8vo, pp. [8], 316. Italic letter; large printer’s device on title, floriated initials; small traces of glue at foot of first three leaves, tiny marginal stain to outer upper corner of f. 27. A fine, wide-margined copy in late sixteenth-century limp vellum; yapp edges, early title inked on spine and later gilt on morocco label, pasted stubs from a dictionary or glossary.

First Italian edition of an epistolary account of the Jesuit missions from all over the early modern world, translated from Spanish. It concerns in particular the vast maritime domain of the Portuguese Empire, consisting of numerous strategical harbours on the coasts of Africa, South Asia and South America. This network was instrumental in controlling the trade of spices and precious metals, but offered also safe starting points for Catholic evangelisation. This collection of letters narrates travels to and fro and daily missionary life in Brazil, India, China, Japan and Ethiopia, providing details of the Jesuit activities, including mass conversions, as well as relevant information on local people, flora and fauna. Often, missives are sent to or from the St Paul’s College of Goa, which was established about 1542 by Francis Xavier as the educational and cultural centre of the Jesuit expansion in the East, and housed the first printing press in India from 1556. These letters were highly sought after in secular Europe, often providing the only reliable information available on the political, economic, commercial and social conditions of large and increasingly important part of the globe.

Not in Adams. BM STC It., 349; Alden, 562/16; Sabin, 5640; Borba de Moraes, I, 51; Cordier, Japonica, 47.

L2144

ITALIAN

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